Tag Archives: The Faculty Management Consultants

Fight Or Flight? How To React To Change

Curl up in a ball, or seize the moment – what’s the best way to move forward in a period of uncertainty and change?

One thing we know, given the past 18 months, is that dramatic political change leads to economic uncertainty. With protectionist sentiment rising, trade remaining stagnant, the US economy led by a skittish and unpredictable President, a host of unknowns around the Brexit fallout, European elections, abandoned trade deals and other shocks, it’s hard to know how to plan ahead.

Elevated uncertainty can lead organisations to perform the enterprise-level equivalent of curling up into a ball. Projects and investment plans are deferred, fewer workers are hired, risk-aversion goes through the roof, short-termism triumphs over long-term growth and earnings take a hit as consumers decrease their spending.

Three high-profile panellists debated this issue at PIVOT: The 10th Asia-Pacific CPO Forum, offering delegates some very different answers to the question of how to react to change. A consensus was reached, however, around one point – the importance of agility.

Giles Breault, Founder of The Beyond Group, shared this gem: “If you believe that necessity is the mother of invention, I’d say uncertainty is the mother of agility.”

A willingness to adapt and adjust

Agility must be encouraged not only at the process level, but at the senior and strategic level too. This means having the ability, and willingness, to change plans at a moment’s notice. Breault told the audience: “When you’re living in an uncertain environment, you need to constantly plan, revisit and do course corrections. Similarly, you need to demand of your suppliers that they’re doing the same thing.”

Does this mean long-term business plans are now unrealistic? It depends entirely on your approach. Companies that “set and forget” three, five, or even ten-year plans, and then stick doggedly to the path, will quickly discover just how rapidly those plans become obsolete.

Increasingly, best-in-class executives are those that possess a degree of flexibility in how their mind works, have a degree of empathy with their people and the market, and can remain confident in the face of ambiguity.

KPMG Australia Chairman Peter Nash said that “there are still many CEOs today who revert to rigid process and a doctrine of control in reaction to issues faced by the business. They draw the decision-making up to themselves and push down their commands. I expect in the future we’ll see a more agile form of CEO emerging.”

Breault also comments on this outdated method of reacting to change, and ties it to redundant leadership skill-sets. “Many executives are finding themselves in an uncomfortable position as they realise that the skills which landed them in their roles aren’t the skills that will keep them there. The very things they congratulated themselves on achieving won’t keep them employed.

“For example, of the fifteen major corporations we’ve talked to, a total of zero had a specific program for digitalisation. These organisations have no plan how to move ahead, which is absolutely stunning.”

Take responsibility for staying informed

Peter Nash told panel facilitator Keith Bird (MD, The Faculty) that CPOs need to take responsibility for informing themselves about changes on the horizon. “Read about the issue, talk to people in your network and find out how it will impact your business by discovering how it’s impacting other businesses. It’s important to have a high degree of personal responsibility when it comes to keeping yourself informed.”

Embrace change

Nash says organisations should make time to examine how they get things done. “Are they tied to rigid processes or to certain types of thinking, or have they moulded their organisation into something more fluid? Do they test new ideas, adapt to disruption and engage with the community? Organisations that are more adaptive will be far more successful than others.”

Looming disruption or inevitable change doesn’t have to be scary. George Boubouras, Managing Director and CIO of Contango Asset Management, had this positive message to share with Forum delegates facing change: “Challenge yourself and prepare for the exciting time ahead! Embrace the disruption with enthusiasm and look at how you can contribute to it.” 

Trailblazing CPO Commercialises Procurement

Broadspectrum CPO Crowned Asia-Pacific’s CPO of The Year

Flipping the old perception of Procurement as a back-room entity on its head, Broadspectrum CPO Kevin McCafferty has been recognised for introducing a value-based approach to procurement and dramatically transforming the function into a customer-oriented, bottom-line focused team.

McCafferty’s achievements in consistently achieving both financial and operational objectives were celebrated at last night’s CPO Forum Gala awards, hosted by leading procurement consultancy The Faculty.

Overseeing a procurement spend of $1.8 billion, Executive General Manager, Procurement Australia and New Zealand, Kevin McCafferty won the 2017 CPO of the Year award, after significantly increasing spend under management and delivering over $50 million EDITDA benefits, against an initial target of $30 million.

Broadspectrum CFO Vince Nicoletti, said: “Since joining two years ago, Kevin has made a significant difference to the procurement function within Broadspectrum. His strong transformational change leadership has seen the area move to a more strategic function within the business, which is now delivering bottom-line results and benefits.

“Most importantly, he has up-skilled and lifted capability across his team and enforced process discipline by implementing appropriate technology and system solutions.

“Kevin and team have also driven commercialisation of procurement and supply chain services into Broadspectrum’s contracts with clients.”

60 Seconds With Kevin McCafferty

Procurious managed to steal 60 seconds with CPO of the Year Winner, Kevin McCafferty, who discussed the number one skill for CPOs of the future.

CPO of Year Winner, Kevin McCafferty : “The key to our success is being recognised at the highest levels of the organisation as a team that creates shareholder value.

“What I discovered when I first started this role was that the approach to procurement was very inward-facing, while the rest of the organisation was focused primarily on the customer. This difference in our focus represented a lack of alignment, so my priority has been to change the thinking across the three teams under Procurement’s umbrella.”

The CPO of the Year award highlights the importance of the CPO role in organisations by recognising a remarkable commercial leader who is making a demonstrable difference to business results, having regard to the circumstances of different industries, budgets and the diversity of procurement team size and experience.

The Faculty’s Founding Chairman, Tania Seary, said: “This significant change projects undertaken by our new CPO of the Year, Kevin McCafferty, highlights how modern procurement teams are driving business innovation by putting the end-customer and shareholder value first.”

“By enabling procurement leaders to drive cultural change internally, Broadspectrum has achieved both bottom-line company benefits, as well as delivering true business and commercial partnering, in a remarkably short period of time.”

About The CPO of the Year Award

The CPO of the Year Award is a flagship initiative of The Faculty, created in 2012 to recognise and celebrate the achievements of procurement professionals across Asia Pacific.

For the past 5 years the Award has celebrated someone who has been assessed as an outstanding leader, a prominent contributor to their business and the broader profession, leading delivery of high ROI, and exceeding performance expectations. The Award is a measure of executive presence, commercial insight, people leadership abilities, innovation, professional advocacy, technical ability and integrity.

The 2017 Judging Panel comprised Ms Sharyn Scriven, Group Manager, Metering Dynamics; Michelle Loader, Chief Executive Officer, Chandler Macleod Group and Matt Perfect, Founder Impact Spender. The meeting was chaired by Tony Megally, General Manager, The Source.

For more information on CPO of the Year click here.

About The Faculty

The Faculty is Asia Pacific’s leading procurement advocates, highlighting the integral role procurement has to play in protecting margins, brand and growth for over thirteen years. Through consulting, professional development and creating knowledge networks for CPOs to share best practice learnings, The Faculty helps business to accelerate and optimise their procurement investment.

For more information on The Faculty click here.

Cyber Criminals Could Hold Your Data Hostage

Password theft, identity theft, ransomware – in an age where hacking has become the career of choice for tech-savvy criminals, data protection must be a top priority for CPOs.

“Cyber criminals don’t need to even leave their house to do damage,” says Craig Hancock, cybersecurity expert and Executive Director of Telstra Service Operations. “One breach of trust and the consequences can be irreparable. These days, the traditional idea of criminals – think balaclavas, weaponry, a getaway car – has moved off the streets and into cyberspace.”

Are you prepared for cyber criminals? Do you have your business information secured? How do you manage the confidential information of your customers? And what do you have in place to mitigate risk?

Hancock will deliver a cybersecurity update at the upcoming 10th Asia-Pacific CPO Forum, where he’ll demonstrate how frighteningly easy it is to steal data from a computer by showing a live hack. “I’m planning on showing the group how easy it can be to hack a business, with basic tools and knowledge. I want to make sure everyone is aware about what goes on in the world of cybersecurity threats, and give them some understanding of what they should be doing to help mitigate these threats.”

“Mitigate” is a key word here, as Hancock predicts the cybersecurity challenge faced by businesses and organisations will continue to grow year on year. Notably, he says that any organisation offering a fix-all solution to “solve” your cybersecurity challenge should be avoided.

“It’s an ongoing challenge – cybersecurity has evolved enormously from five years ago, and is likely to look entirely different again by 2020. There’s no single ‘fix’ and there are plenty of bright, shiny objects to distract your security team. You would be wise to put in place some basic, common-sense measures and controls and partner with an organisation that understands the extent of the threat.”

What are the risks?

Cybercrime can be initiated through your head office, at weak point in your supply chain, or even through IoT-enabled devices with low-level protection. Among the types of crime that can take place, Hancock mentions:

  • Password theft: with the obvious prize being the password or access code to users’ bank accounts.
  • Identity theft: a customer’s date of birth and other key information (such as health records) enables criminals to assume their identity, or to sell on this information to others. This can be very expensive for the company that has suffered the breach.
  • Ransomware: Hackers can lock your company’s data in an encrypted vault and demand a ransom for its release. A famous example of this occurred last year when a cyberattack on a Los Angeles hospital left doctors locked out of patient records for over a week, with the hackers demanding a ransom of $3.7 million in Bitcoin.

Telstra’s Craig Hancock will deliver a cybersecurity update at PIVOT: The Faculty’s 10th Annual Asia Pacific CPO Forum.

Do CEOs Dream Of Robotic Sheep?

…Or are they kept awake at night worrying about how to adapt their business to a robotic-centred future? KPMG Australia Chairman Peter Nash reveals two concerns playing havoc with the sleep patterns of business leaders.

How can I adapt my business to a robotic future?

The thing about technological disruption – and machine intelligence in particular – is that people tend to regard it as a challenge to deal with at some point in the future. The key to understanding the scope of the challenge is to break it down into two categories – disruption that we’re already dealing with, and disruption that is yet to emerge.

Robotic process automation (RPA), for example, has been around for decades, with disembodied robot arms a common sight on production lines. Typically, they automate a series of existing processes that were once carried out by humans. We’re just starting to realise the full potential of RPA, with the emergence of bots that sit inside software to automate administrative labour becoming more common.

From his viewpoint into many of KPMG’s client organisations, Peter Nash has seen what an RPA bot is capable of. “If you go into any call centre, you’ll observe staff doing a series of processes as they engage with customers – typically around data capture and data entry. Through observation, you can create “process flows”, and then build software that can be inserted into the call centre and automate the data capture. That’s a classic example of robotic process automation, and it’s happening at pace.”

Interestingly, RPA is resulting in the reshoring of capability from overseas. Nash comments: “You can track the life cycle of offshoring and reshoring. 10 years ago you may have had 100 people doing a job in Australia for the cost of $5 million. Those 100 jobs were offshored to India, resulting in costs being reduced to $1 million. Today, with robotic help, you can have only 10 people doing the same work that 100 used to do – at a cost of $0.5 million. Yes, 90 jobs have disappeared, but there’s the exciting potential for completely new jobs to be created with each technological leap.”

“Artificial (or Cognitive) Intelligence, for example, is only just beginning to emerge. People are very excited about AI’s enormous potential, but at present it’s essentially a solution looking for a problem.”

How do I effectively harness innovation?

Nash comments that there are several models that have emerged in the ways corporations seek to harness innovation. “Many CPOs look for innovation to emerge from down the line, and encourage people, whether they’re in-house employees or suppliers, to bring ideas forward. Other organisations set up innovation capability ‘hubs’ or ‘accelerators’. Another approach is to acquire, or partner with, innovation capability outside of your organisation. Some business are doing a mix of all three.”

“What’s encouraging is that most businesses understand that today, it’s innovate or perish. A culture of innovation, partnered with a culture of flexibility where people have the ability to react and respond to disruptive technology, will ensure businesses are able to take advantage of anything that comes their way.”

KPMG Australia Chairman Peter Nash will deliver a keynote speech at PIVOT: The Faculty’s 10th Annual Asia Pacific CPO Forum.

 

Leading Australian Political Journalist Unravels Political Landscape

Australia’s political landscape is a complex beast. We ask senior Fairfax political editor Laura Tingle to unravel these complexities for procurement professionals.

Political Landscape - Laura Tingle

No matter which political party you back, there’s no doubt that the political landscape can have major ramifications on the procurement function within your business.

So, we asked Fairfax Media‘s Political Editor, Laura Tingle, to unravel the elements of politics, as Australia wades through this longest of all election campaigns, and try to understand what sort of government it faces after July 2.

“It’s Complicated”

Laura explains that Australia heads into the upcoming election with Labor currently holding a ‘notional’ 57 seats and the Coalition – after Tony Abbott’s big victory – holding a ‘notional’ 89 seats.

“The national polls currently suggest – on a swing of about 2.5 per cent against the Coalition since the last election – that we have started the election campaign in the realms of an outcome where the government would just get back into office, or where there might be a hung parliament.

“That is, there are 13 Coalition seats held with a margin of less than 2.5 per cent, just one seat less than would need to change hands for the Coalition to lose its absolute majority,” Tingle says.

But, as the saying goes, ‘it’s always complicated’, and in fact, at this election it is particularly complicated, she says.

“And I can’t think of an election where there are so many unknown factors at play, which could create some quite wild outcomes.”

Election Zeitgeist

Speaking at the 2016 9th Asia-Pacific CPO Forum in Melbourne to an audience of about 50 leading procurement professionals, Tingle spoke swiftly, explaining how she saw things.

Another complication, on both sides of the political fence, is the unprecedented number of retirements of sitting members (21), meaning the loss of personal margins of longstanding MPs.

Laura explains, “My apologies for bombarding you with numbers. But they all play in to the zeitgeist of the current election campaign, and the unprecedented uncertainty around the likely outcome.

“When you say ‘uncertainty’ in politics, people think that that is, by definition, a very bad thing – that the country is heading in to some unknown period of terrible instability in the political landscape.

“When I say uncertainty, I mean it in the sense that, more than is usually the case, we really don’t know what the election outcome will be if we judge it purely by the numbers. If we judge it by gut instinct – do voters think one leader has nicer teeth – and other less scientific outcomes, there actually seems a little bit more certainty.”

“The questions comes down to whether the electorate really wants yet another change in prime minister? And whether Bill Shorten created – or can create in the next two months – a sense of momentum for change, as well as a strong relationship with voters who, until very recently, utterly dismissed him?

“And has the electorate’s view of the Coalition become so firmly entrenched in the negative that it just wants to get rid of the government?” she says.

“Think about the election result in those terms and your gut says – well at least my gut says – ‘no’ to all three questions.”

Policy Towards Business

Bill Shorten deserves full credit for leading a team that has gone on the front foot on policy and who has managed to bury the perceptions of disunity within the Labor Caucus, Tingle told the audience.

He’s a good campaigner and has started the formal campaign well. The more voters have seen of him in the past couple of weeks, in particular, the more they have liked him, she says.

Tingle told the audience that the Coalition has been thrown off course in the past couple of years, first by its utter political incompetence and lack of policy savvy. The 2014 budget has become the byword for this, but there was much that proceeded it in terms of policy towards business even before the budget was brought down.

“Having made such a mess of things, and then under intense political pressure, the government – still under Tony Abbott – tried to clean up, for which you could use the 2015 budget as the guide.

“But there was still a lot of mess, a lot of conflicting signals, and a lot of policy that is still on the books which is bad or politically untenable,” she says.

“Issues like health funding, schools funding, universities funding are massively complicated now for both sides of politics. They involve the goodwill and assistance of the states in all cases.

“And I have to say that, while I perhaps have more reason to be cynical than a lot of you, having spent 30 years to close to the political action, I actually think we have got a better bunch of competent people – professional politicians who are actually interested in policy as much as just winning – than we have had for a very long time.”

Tingle finished by warning that a number of things could go pear shaped in the world’s political landscape in the next three years.

“I would like to leave you today with the optimistic message that I believe both candidates for the prime ministership are capable people, with capable teams, not driven by ideology but by pragmatism,” she says.