Tag Archives: Trump

There’s One Key Reason To Buy American In 2017

With the Trump administration’s “Made in America” campaign in full swing, attention has turned to the Pentagon’s global supply chain. The reasons to Buy American might be a little more compelling than you expected….

In 1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the 1933 Buy American Act which required the Pentagon to purchase US-manufactured products for anything over a $3,500 threshold. The military supply chain looked very different to today’s, over 80 years later.

The law required that the U.S. military’s entire supply chain be sourced domestically, from the textiles that go into uniforms to the raw materials that are used to create tanks and other weaponry. Roosevelt’s intention was clear: firstly, the law was a patriotic one, with the ‘buy American’ message resonating as strongly in the 1930s as it does among voters today. More importantly, the Act was designed to ensure a strong manufacturing base, critical to the country’s recovery from the Great Depression.

Roosevelt said in 1940: “Guns, planes, ships and many other things have to be built in the factories and the arsenals of America. They have to be produced by workers and managers and engineers with the aid of machines which, in turn, have to be built by hundreds of thousands of workers throughout the land.”

Is Buy American realistic in 2017?

While the 1933 law is ostensibly still in effect, the military supply chain draws heavily on foreign materials and components. In 2013, for example, nearly $20 billion (6.4 per cent of all U.S. military spending) went to overseas entities. This is achieved through the use of exemptions or waivers, which guarantee flexibility and security of supply.

After the White House published a “Buy American” executive order in April, the Office of Management and Budget provided new guidance to federal agencies on enforcing the existing laws, limiting exemptions and maximising the procurement of U.S. products. The Pentagon’s acquisitions office has reportedly instructed its contractors to put in place a training program on how to comply with the 1933 law.

However, there are also a number of materials that simply can’t be found or manufactured domestically, such as the rare earth element needed for flame-resistant rayon fibres used in uniforms (sourced solely from Austria), night vision goggles (91 per cent of which are from China), or lithium ion batteries, semiconductors, microchips and even missile propellant.

Is cybersecurity a reason to Buy American?

Two of the reasons for the 1933 Buy American Act – building patriotism and manufacturing jobs – still remain valid and are a key focus on Trump’s administration, but in today’s world of hi-tech military hardware, there’s a third, critical factor – cybersecurity.

Commentators are alarmed by the presence of Chinese-made microchips in America’s most advanced fighter jets, while components from other foreign entities can be found in American communication satellites, unmanned drones, bomb disposal robots and other gear. Futurist and author Peter Singer, predicted that these microchips could be used to “blow American fighter jets from the sky” if the two countries were ever to go to war.

While very little can be done about the rare-earth materials and metals found only outside of the U.S., it remains to be seen whether the Made in America push will lead to supply chains for vital components including microchips and semiconductors re-shored to the U.S.

In other news this week…

Supply Chain Management software market booming

  • Analyst firm Gartner has announced that the supply chain management (SCM) software market will reach $13 billion by the end of this year, up 11% from 2016.
  • Gartner has also predicted the market will exceed $19 billion by 2021.
  • Growth is being driven by a demand for agility, as vendors move to cloud-first or could-only deployment models, while end-users are becoming more comfortable about cloud security and recognise the benefits of software-as-a-service solutions.

Read more on MH&L news 

When does an SME need a procurement function?

  • New research from Wax Digital has found that having a procurement function is just as vital for SMEs as it is for large corporates.
  • The UK-based survey found that 75% of respondents said procurement was needed once a company reaches a £50M turnover, 77% claim to need procurement by the time it has 100 supplier contracts, and 72% said that procurement was necessary once 500 invoices per month were being processed.
  • Rising costs was the most common reason for introducing procurement, followed closely by inefficient processes and increasing business risk.

For more information visit www.waxdigital.com

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop hits the news again

  • Tech entrepreneur Elon Musk made headlines on Friday when he announced via Twitter that he had “verbal approval” to build a hyperloop – an ultra-high-speed underground transport system – linking New York and Washington DC.
  • If it goes ahead, passengers and cargo would be packed into pods and shot through a system of giant vacuum tubes on magnetic cushions, cutting the current travel time from nearly three hours (high speed train) to 29 minutes for the 355km journey.
  • Musk has also been in conversation with Chicago and Los Angeles officials about hyperloops.

Read more at Financial Review

 

24 Series 9: India Plants 66 Million Trees

The following events occur in real time: India takes on the monumental challenge of planting 66 million trees in just 24 hours. And they didn’t even need Jack Bauer’s help…

The world reeled when, last month, President Trump made the decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Many regarded this as the most devastating decision of his presidency so far and he has faced critisicm for his short-termism, isolationism and rejection of science.

Todd Stern, writing for The Atlantic shortly before Trump made the announcment expressed the concern of many that “the Paris regime cannot work in the long run if the world’s indispensable power has left the table.”

“The Trump administration is about to throw down the gauntlet.” He continued. “If it does, we’ll need to take up the challenge.”

If this week’s evidence is anything to go by…the challenge is very much accepted!

There are 66 million new trees in India…

An astonishing 1.5 million volunteers pledged to “Make India Green Again” as they planted 66 million trees in less than 24 hours.

Volunteers of all ages assembled along the Narmada River in Madhya Pradesh, Central India,  to plant 20 varieties of tree as part of a new Guiness World Record attempt. India holds the previous world record for planting 49.3 million trees in 24 hours last year in Uttar Pradesh. This year, they’ve gone several steps (16.7 million trees!) further and done it in just 12 hours.

India has  promised to increase forest coverage to 95 million hectares by 2030 as part of it’s role in the Paris Agreement. The Indian governement has forecasted a spend of $6.2 billion for creating new forests.

Madhya Pradesh’s government spearheaded this particualr campaign and were understandably thrilled with its success.

Shivraj Singh Chouhan, state chief minister for the region, tweeted after the event: “Thank people of Jabalpur for making tree plantation a huge success. You are not only saving Narmada, but also [the] planet.”

“We cannot be too selfish. We have to spare something for upcoming generations,” he continued.

Is planting with drones the future of sustainability?

Australia’s answer to deforestation is a little more technical than the enlisting of 1.5 million volunteers!

Dr. Susan Graham, an Australian engineer, is developing a drone that could eventually result in the planting of an additional 1 bilion trees per year, and there’s no time to waste! NASA predicts that if current deforestation levels proceed, the world’s rainforests may be completely in as little as 100 years.

The world has lost nearly half its forests for agriculture, development or resource extraction. An estimated 18 million acres are lost each year and deforestation and forest degradation are responsible for 17 per cent of all carbon emissions. The value of the benefits that standing forests provide is immense.

The planet loses 15 billion trees every year so “although we plant about 9 billion trees every year, that leaves a net loss of 6 billion trees,” Dr Graham said. “The rate of replanting is just too slow.”

The drones that Dr Graham is developing could not only plant at ten times the rate of hand planting and at 20 per cent of the cost; they can also access, and plant, in previously inacessible areas , such as mountainsides or steep hills.

The drone technology is currently being tested around the world so watch this space!

What are your views on sustainability and deforestation? What can, and should,  organisations be doing to help? Let us know in the comments section below. 

In other procurement news this week….

Japan & EU Trade Deal Snubs Trump

  • Japan took on the mantle of the global rules-based trading system, as it sidestepped a failing trade agreement with the United States to forge a historic new pact with the European Union
  • The trade deal that will cover nearly 30 percent of the global economy, 10 percent of the world’s population and 40 percent of global trade
  • The deal would lower trade barriers for a sweeping array of products, including pork, wine, cheese and automobiles. The pact would be a heavy blow to American producers of these goods/

Read more on The Washington Post

How Will Northern Ireland’s ££ Be Spent?

  • Northern Ireland is set to receive an extra £1bn over the next two years as part of a deal with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) to keep Theresa May’s minority government in power
  • Arlene Foster, leader of the DUP, said the deal would boost the economy and allow investment in new infrastructure, health and education
  • There are around 1.8m people in Northern Island and the headline deal equates to an extra £550 per head

Read more on Supply Management

Amazon’s latest venture is wine!

  • Amazon’s continuing quest to make and sell everything in the world has led to it branching out into a new area: overseeing the production of a new range of wines
  • Unusually for Amazon, this new brand isn’t aimed at undercutting the competition with bargain-basement prices, as with its Amazon Basics line
  • Amazon Wine’s Nick Loeffler added: “We’re thrilled to connect wineries, like King Estate, with millions of customers and give them an innovative format to launch new brands”

Read more on The Guardian 

China’s TIP Demotion: Productive ot Provocative?

2017’s Trafficking in Persons report highlights China as one of the worst global offenders of human trafficking. How does this impact your supply chain decisions? 

The U.S.  government revealed details of its annual Trafficking in Persons (TIP) report last week. The report is the government’s principal diplomatic tool to engage foreign governments on human trafficking.  Rex W. Tillerson, Secretary of State said this year’s report “highlights the successes achieved and the remaining challenges before us on this important global issue.”

The U.S department of state assigns each country to one of three tiers (Tier 1 being the best and Tier 3, the worst) based on their government’s efforts to acknowledge, combat and prosecute instances of human trafficking. Countries must consistently demonstrate improvement in these areas to maintain the highest ranking and avoid demotion.

Myanmar, for example, was one of the countries to be upgraded to Tier 2, following its efforts to reduce child recruitment for the military.

But the most controversial decision this year was China’s demotion to Tier 3, where it will join the likes of Iran, North Korea, Russia and Venezuela.

“China was downgraded to Tier 3 status in this year’s report in part because it has not taken serious steps to end its own complicity in trafficking, including forced laborers from North Korea that are located in China,” Tillerson said as he presented the report.

The demotion marks the first time that  the Trump administration has publicly criticised Beijing’s human rights record, and it prompted an unsurpringly frosty response from the Chinese, “The government’s determination in fighting human trafficking is unwavering and outcomes are there for all to see,” spokesman Lu Kang said. “China firmly opposes the US’ irresponsible remarks on other countries’ fight against human trafficking, based on its domestic laws.”

How Will This Impact China And Global Supply Chains?

There are a number of things to consider if your global supply chain extends to China or other countries ranked in Tier 3.

  • The U.S may consider imposing sanctions that limit access to US and international aid. Congressman Chris Smith said  “Hopefully, the new tier ranking coupled with robust diplomacy—including the imposition of sanctions authorised under Tier 3—will lead to systemic reforms that will save women and children’s lives and ensure that Chinese exports are not made with slave labor.”  Whilst such sanctions have often been waived in the past, it would come as no surprise if Trump decided to break with tradition. Indeed, given his vocal criticism of Chinese trade, he will be under some pressure to impose consequences.  It has been reported this week that Trump is considering trade actions against Beijing including tariffs on steel imports.
  • Suppliers operating in newly placed tier 3 countries will, appropriately, be under increased preasure to audit their supply chains. If you’re sourcing in China, it’s entirely plausible that you’re complicit in trafficking or forced labour.  With supply chains facing extra scruntiny, it would be prudent for organisations sourcing in China to have accurate information at their fingertips. Make sure you know who you are sourcing from, what’s going on behind the scenes of your product and make detailed lists of every farm, vessel or facility to which you are connected.
  • China’s demotion might prompt organisations to stop sourcing in China altogether. Will  “Made in China” labels deter consumers who want to avoid supporting slave labour and traffcking? Changing suppliers, particularly when it’s to a new country,  is time-consuming and expensive. This will be the greatest concern for procurement and supply chain pros.

You can download the TIP Report in full here

What do you think about China’s demotion in this year’s Trafficking in Persons Report? Productive or provocative? Should President Trump impose sanctions on China? Let us know what you think in the comments below. 

In other procurement news this week….

Will Supermarkets Go Uber On Us?

  • Britain’s major supermarkets are testing ‘peak time’ pricing allowing grocers to raise or cut items based on demand
  • Tesco, Morrisons and Mark & Spencer are running trials of electronic labels which allow them to change prices at the click of a button
  • Retail experts say this could spell the end of fixed prices for consumer goods and services within five years, to be replaced by an Uber-style pricing revolution
  • Morrisons said its trial was in the “early stages” and it had not yet decided whether to roll it out across the country

Read more on International Business Times.

Apple Is Moving Its Supply Chain Towards Green Energy

  • Two years ago, Apple embarked on an ambitious plan to help its biggest suppliers switch to clean power sources. As of early June, the tech giant has managed to get eight partners on board
  • According to the tech giant’s latest update on its progress toward environmental goals, integrated circuit packaging maker Ibiden will be the first partner in Japan to power its Apple-related operations completely with renewable energy
  • Apple’s $1.5 billion green bond issued in February 2016 is still the largest issued by any U.S. technology company

Read more on Green Biz.

AI that can read minds 

  • CMU scientists have been working on is a system that can apparently read complex thoughts based on brain scans, possibly even interpreting complete sentences
  • Using a smart algorithm, the team could discern what was being thought about at any given time — and even the order of a particular sentence
  • After training the algorithm on 239 of the 240 sentences and their corresponding brain scans, the researchers were able to predict the final sentence based only on the brain data

Read more on Digital Trends