Videos

Know someone who is curious about Procurious? Share our ‘What is Procurious?’ video

As a member of Procurious, you have shown yourself to be one of the first-movers of the procurement and supply chain profession: You’re globally connected, you’re innovative, you’re influential and you’re in-the-know.  

We want to send out a big thank-you for being a part of Procurious – a healthy community thrives on its members, their knowledge, curiosity, and desire to share. Without your support this widespread procurement community of ours would still be lost, we hope that since becoming a member you’re of the belief that Procurious is helping to fix the disconnect inherent in our profession.

But perhaps you’ve struggled to explain the Procurious concept to your peers? Well we’ve just finished the wrap on our ‘What is Procurious?’ animated video – a video we’d love you to share with others!  It conveys all of the benefits that will already be well-known to you – our Procurious ambassadors.

We wanted to make our video fun, friendly and informative – and we certainly enjoyed putting it together, so we hope you love it as much as we do!

Want to tell others about this exciting community you’re a part of? Instead of reeling off a sales-pitch, why not direct them to the video and let the pictures do the talking!

Procurious fast facts

You have helped to push the number of our members to 4000+, and collectively you hail from more than 100 countries worldwide. This just goes to show that procurement is truly global!

  • You represent the world’s leading organisations including: Apple, IBM, Microsoft, Starbucks, Shell, Rio Tinto, Qantas, HSBC, SAP, NHS, British Airways and many, many more
  • You’ve started over 230 discussions and contributed 1000 answers, making Procurious a ‘braintrust’ for the brightest minds
  • Thanks to you we have amassed almost 2000 followers across our other social media channels including Twitter (@procurious_ ), LinkedIn, Facebook and Google+
  • With our collection of 50+ bite-sized e-learning videos from the world’s best trainers – we’re learning new skills together 
  • Procurious is home to a daily news service and guest blogs from leading global procurement experts (your peers)

If you’re reading this you’re probably already a Procurious member, so why not share the video with your peers, friends, family, the other businesses that share your building… Tweet the link, stick it on Facebook, post it on LinkedIn and spread the word!

Enjoy the video, and thanks for watching – after-all, we couldn’t have done this without you! Procurious HQ

Is there humour in your supply chain?

“Comedy is acting out optimism.” – Robin Williams

“Humour is everywhere, in that there’s irony in just about anything a human does.” – Bill Nye

We’ve probably all been exposed to Jim Carrey showing the funny side of a supply chain risk in the classic Ace Ventura… But here’s a few other examples you might not have seen.

These videos all use comedy to highlight (and in some cases, solve) problems in the supply chain – taking in everything from sourcing to logistics.

Supply chain blackhole? Better check the stock room…

A group of MBA students use skills learned in their Supply Chain class to point out the inefficiencies of the latest “green” bathroom remodel at ASU’s WP Carey School of Business.

Like any good MBA students, they don’t just point out the problem, they offer solutions…

Greg tries to outsmart Diego and find a cheaper Less than Truckload (LTL) freight solution in the pilot episode of Logistically Challenged.

Have you come across any other humorous examples? Highlight your video picks in the comments below.

Amazon’s Christmas logistics robot army

The robots are coming… and they’re bringing Christmas presents!

In its latest bid to boost productivity and expedite delivery, Internet retailer Amazon is deploying a robot army – yep, just in time for Christmas.

Various sources are reporting that squat, orange, robots have entered several of its U.S. warehouses. The addition of these wheeled droids will save workers having to traipse the factory floor and scour long aisles chockful of Amazon goodies (sometimes up to 20 miles a day).

The addition of the robots is expected to bring in an impressive productivity boost – making picking and scanning 300+ items an hour a reality (compared to 100 previously).

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos told investors earlier this year that in total the company hoped to move 10,000 robots onto the factory floor. Such a move was only made possible after Amazon bought Kiva Systems’ material handling solution in 2012.

There is now a playable warehouse and logistics simulator…

The game (available on PC via Steam) sees you progress through various timed-based scenarios to move goods around a supermarket, warehouse and production facility.

But this isn’t just any old logistics simulator, oh no. The official website makes a big deal of the Jungheinrich affiliation – that’s an actual Jungheinrich forklift truck you’re controlling.  The company is based in Hamburg, Germany and one of the leading international companies in the material handling equipment, warehousing and material flow engineering sectors.

The game offers would-be forklift operators a variety of quests, different game modes, and realistic physics. A handful of comments from YouTubers come from those within the forklift industry itself –  complete with lighthearted observations… The simulator is presumably designed to train-up new operators right?

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Supply chain issues on the small (and silver) screen

According to an excellent commentary from The Guardian, viral YouTube hits and blockbusting movie releases are helping to shine light on pertinent issues affecting supply chains the world over.

The Guardian cites such cinematic successes as Blood Diamond, alongside indie-documentaries like Blood in the Mobile (an expose on mobile phone production methods that are financing war in the DR Congo), and The Price of Sugar (at what human cost is sugar produced?) But there’s also a growing glut of online-only, YouTube short films – each aiming to achieve the same goals.

The Story of Stuff is a great example, as well as being something of a YouTube success story… Originally released in 2007, it’s been watched by over 44 million worldwide.

The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to create a more sustainable and just world. It’ll teach you something, it’ll make you laugh, and it just may change the way you look at all the stuff in your life forever.

Can you recommend any other videos that are making similar waves in these areas?

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Has RFID technology revolutionised logistics?

This video from IBM demonstrates how RFID technology could revolutionise logistics services… But this isn’t from 2014, instead it’s been sitting gathering dust on YouTube since 2006.

So what’s happened in the preceding years? Honestly, not as much as you’d have thought… RFID has faced a number of challenges despite its advantages and usefulness within industry. But not from lobbyists with privacy concerns, conspiracy theorists, or lunatics who believe RFID has something to do with the Mark of the Beast. Instead it is feared that RFID technology has the potential to place significant complications on organisations as it opens them up to external (often invisible) risks.

Sports manufacturer Adidas has just attracted considerable attention by sewing RFID tags into the jerseys of national football teams.

In a statement to Deutsche Welle, Adidas said: “As part of a logistics project we have tested for the first time an RFID label with a virtual number. It is a read-only label without any additional data. The label is not tied to the article number, size or color of the article and we also can’t link it with end customer data. It is of course up to customer of this product to cut out the RFID label along the dashed line and throw it in the trash”.

So just what is RFID anyway?

RFID is short for radio-frequency identification, it transmits data wirelessly through the use of electromagnetic fields. There are many benefits for adopting RFID technology into your products, not to mention its barely-there proportions, and teensy price-tag (in-fact EPCglobal is campaigning for the cost to fall to just 5 cents). When applied it functions as a tracking device (of sorts), allowing the producer to keep tabs if they so wish.

Today you can find RFID tags being commonly used across storage and logistics industries. Retail is also catching-on, so it’s not surprising to learn of Adidas’ dabbling.

The participants at this Canadian yoga event confirmed their attendance at a RFID-fitted kiosk. And the library at Sydney’s University of Technology is looked after by robots – how is this possible you ask? Through RFID of course…

Have you got the eye of the tiger?

When people bang-on about training, your first thought usually turns to this…

As empowering and utterly brilliant that may be, we’re here today to talk about something that can do for you what Survivor did for Rocky in the ring.

Procurious has an ever-growing collection of fine training videos and learning materials for your consumption. What’s more, they’re bite-size, so you can graze as much as you like without ever having too much.

Browse our selection of educational videos

Our Learning page can be accessed from anywhere on the site – here you’ll be presented with a selection of videos (we call them ‘featured classes’) to browse.

You might have noticed that some videos are listed as free, while others carry a charge. If you’re not looking to spend there’s still a healthy selection to choose from, but some of the more specialised lessons will require you to dip into your pockets.

How will I know if a lesson is for me?

Never fear, each paid video provides a short second sampler (anywhere from 25-45seconds), so you can watch and decide if it’s really for you. If you like what you see – just click the ‘Add this class to cart’ button, and proceed through the checkout process.

Purchasing lessons on Procurious

You can opt to have your billing information saved for future purchases if you so choose – just tick the respective box before making your payment.

Changed your mind? You can remove the class from your shopping cart in two ways: Either click the ‘X Remove from cart’ prompt, or select the ‘Clear cart’ command from the Your Cart screen. You can access this at any time, just click the shopping trolley icon next to your mailbox and notifications.

Exploring the lessons tree

Training videos on Procurious

After selecting lesson, the next thing you’ll want to do is watch the thing. In the player view you’ll also see the Lessons tree – this can be used to navigate between the different sections of the video (if the lesson is split into parts).

A (tricky) lesson learnt

Each class also carries its own difficulty rating. These range from videos suitable for all levels, through to the more advanced/intermediate where prior knowledge of the topics covered is advised.

Armed with this knowledge, go forth and explore the Learning available on Procurious! Alternatively if you’d like to talk to us about adding your training materials to our collection, please get in touch here.

Would you trust your deliveries to a drone?

Google has just shown its secret ‘Project Wing’ drone-based delivery system to the world.

The fruits of the work  Google’s shadowy X research arm has achieved so far can be seen in the video below:

During a test-run Project Wing flew through the Queensland skies to successfully deliver supplies to Australian farmers.

To accompany the video Google provided the following:

“Throughout history, major shifts in how we move goods from place to place have led to new opportunities for economic growth and generally made consumers’ lives easier. From steam ships to the railroads, from the postal service to delivery services like FedEx and DHL, speed has reshaped society not only with greater convenience but also by making more goods accessible to more people.”

It continued: “Self-flying vehicles could open up entirely new approaches to moving goods – including options that are cheaper, faster, less wasteful and more environmentally sensitive than what’s possible today.”

The prototype is based on a single-wing drone design, and measures just 1.5m-wide (5ft). Four adjustable propellers control the drone through the flight, moving accordingly throughout its journey. In this example the goods to be delivered fit snugly in gap located in the middle of the wing.

Drone wars

For once Google isn’t first to the punch… Internet retailer Amazon has been toying with a drone delivery programme since it announced the ‘Prime Air’ service towards the latter end of 2013.

Of course, the fight for air supremacy doesn’t end with Amazon vs. Google… Aviation rules would need to be changed to allow use of unmanned civilian aircraft systems. What’s more, drones also fly in the face of dyed-in-the-wool privacy regulations, as many believe that drones have the potential to infringe on our base privacy rights.

And finally: Disney wants to use floating drones to power floating puppets… further proof (if it were needed) that the future is shaping-up to be pretty weird.

Google’s asking for interested parties to express their interest using this online form. Want to read more? The Atlantic has a comprehensive write-up about Project Wing on its website.

Walmart pimped-up its fleet – capable of massive loads

Now that’s what I call a truck…

The Walmart Advanced Vehicle Experience concept truck is the latest in the retailer’s fleet efficiency program.

The one-of-a-kind prototype offers a whole package of firsts. The tractor boasts advanced aerodynamics and is powered by a prototype advanced turbine-powered, range-extending series hybrid powertrain. It certainly sounds impressive, even if we’re not 100 per cent sure what it does…

The trailer is made almost exclusively with carbon fiber, saving around 4,000 pounds that can then be utilised to carry more freight.

Would this transform your transportation services?

Is this the world’s most connected man?

Say hello to “the most connected human on Earth”.

Chris Dancy - the most connected man in the world
Copyright: Chris Dancy

The name Chris Dancy probably doesn’t mean much to you now, but after watching this video you’ll find it hard to pass him in the street…

Here Chris talks to The Wall St Journal candidly about how tracking his life has helped him, and whether he envisions a day when everyone will do the same.

Chris Dancy has been tracking his life for the past five years and is now often connected to as many as 700 sensors, devices, apps, and services at a time.  With these he is able to monitor, analyse, and optimize every minutiae of his person to alter the way his body works.

Chris is a fascinating (if bizarre) half-man, half-machine. However we can’t help but wonder if he’s gone a step too far. After-all, it is a hell of a commitment, and you wouldn’t want to be stuck behind him in the queue for airport security…