Procurious boasts members from 100+ countries

What’s procurement like in your part of the world?

At the time of writing Procurious boasts members from 100+ countries, is yours represented?

Procurious boasts members from 100+ countries

We’re truly global

Yes we may keep a map of the world on the wall at Procurious HQ… What of it?

From Azerbaijan to Zambia, Procurious members circle the world! If you’re just casually browsing the site, why not join up and stake a claim for your part of the world?

We want to hear your stories! How well is procurement represented, what’s it like being a procurement professional – how does it differ from elsewhere in the world? Drop us a line if you’d like to be featured, just like Helen, Happymore, Hal, and Sergio below:

Exciting times ahead for Scotland

We asked Helen Mackenzie about procurement in Scotland:

“Not sure about the Scottish private sector but public procurement in Scotland is really buzzing at the moment.  The Scottish Government’s just got the new Procurement Reform Act through the Parliament and so sustainable procurement is high up on our agenda.  

There’s never been a better time to be in public procurement.  At last many of us are getting to take up our seat right in the heart of corporate management and decision making.”

Click here to read the rest of Helen’s piece.

Procurement in the USA? A different beast

Flying the flag for the US, Hal Good could only estimate when quizzed on the number of working professionals throughout the 50 constituent states:

“In 2008, according to the Department of Labor, there were 68,000 “purchasing mangers” employed in the US.  The latest Bureau of Labor statistics estimated 504,600 “jobs” for Purchasing managers, buyers and purchasing agents.”

How does it differ exactly? “Contractors doing business with the US Federal Government, are committed to utilization of the FAR program which gave rise to the National Contract Association (NCMA) and its educational programs and credentials.  

This has spawned a difference in terminology and to some extent practices within the profession in the USA itself, as well as with the rest of the world.  That is probably due to the vast influence of CIPS in the international arena.”

See Hal’s answers in full.

What does procurement mean to developing countries?

Procurious member Happymore Mambondiani previously spoke to us about some of the challenges procurement poses in his home country – Zimbabwe:

“Currently procurement is undertaken by unqualified personnel in the majority of organisations in the country be it in the public or private sector.

In Zimbabwe (unlike other countries where procurement has grown as a profession), procurement has not yet developed into a function. Instead it has been lumped into a wing under the finance department – this is true except for all but the biggest firms like Tangaat Hullets (a sugar producing company) in the South East Low veld of Chiredzi/Triangel.

At a National level procurement is undertaken by the State Procurement Board which is under the Ministry of Finance. The State Procurement Board should be a ministry dedicated to the handling of government purchases of goods and services.”

See more of what Happymore has to say here.

Italy: home to some of the best negotiators in the world…

Procurious’ greatest Italian advocate – Sergio Giordano, explains how procurement has been split into two:

“Once Procurement in Italy was ’emotional price negotiation’ the Italian Procurement professional was one of the best negotiator in the world … but nothing else. Today in Italy things are partially changed, there are two distinctly separate worlds in procurement management – 

  • The large national and multinational companies in which the concept of Procurement has evolved (not just negotiating the price but the TCO, the knowledge of local and global market, management of the relationship with suppliers, the use of e-Procurement, Lean Procurement approach, etc…) they use the same “tools” and strategies of the most competitive and advanced European nations.
  • SMEs (92% of the Italian companies). Today SMEs are realising that joining in network can help to become competitive to the market as large companies and things are changing also in the Procurement management.

However, in Sergio’s opinion one distinctive difference will always remain: “during the negotiations Italians tend to play ‘Poker’ instead of ‘Bridge’…”

Hear more from the great man – view his comments in full.