All posts by Procurious HQ

3 Key Differences Between CIPS & ISM Certification – But Why It Doesn’t Matter!

When it comes to professional accreditation for procurement and supply chain, there are several options available. But, as it turns out, all are equally good for your professional development.


Unlike other professions, procurement and supply chain does not have one, single governing professional body. While this does make things slightly more complicated, it does provide professionals with a greater degree of choice when it comes to their professional accreditation journey.

Individual decisions may be based on geography, field of procurement, or even previous and current job roles. And while people will make different choices, it does not mean that any of these options are better than the other or will hinder career progression in the long-term.

Previous articles on Procurious on professional accreditation have focused largely on CIPS and the MCIPS/FCIPS qualifications. However, in order to provide a broader view on available accreditation, we need to look at other institutions like the Institute of Supply Management (ISM), and their widely-recognised Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) qualification.

To understand which qualification is better suited to you as an individual, we need to look at the key differences in the organisations and accreditation, and how your decision may impact your future career.

1. Geographical

The main difference between the two organisations is a geographical one.

CIPS is headquartered in the UK and has a very strong network in its home country. It has also developed strong network bases in EMEA and Australasia, with each region having its own management structure, as well as a strong presence in Africa and East Asia. It is a truly global Institute, with over 200,000 members worldwide.

ISM was founded in North America in 1915 and has consolidated its base in this region. It doesn’t have the same global branch network as CIPS, with its networking predominantly focused in the USA. But it is starting to spread its network worldwide, including an increasing membership throughout Latin America, with over 50,000 members from 100 countries.

2. Time & Study Format

When it comes to qualifications, it’s hard to split the two bodies. Both take procurement and supply professionals from student or entry-level members and provide learning, development and examination in order to progress to accreditation. The time taken to achieve the qualification and the method of study are slightly different, however.

CIPS’ key accreditation is MCIPS, with the opportunity to become a Fellow (FCIPS) of the Institute beyond this. Depending on the starting level, experience and nature of study, accreditation can take anywhere between 3 and 6 years to complete. Learning materials and exams are all available digitally, though study can be undertaken in person where available.

CIPS also provides the opportunity to gain MCIPS via an accredited degree, a Management Entry Route or Corporate Award, all of which reduce the requirement for CIPS exams themselves.

The ISM Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) qualification generally takes between 6 and 12 months to complete, depending on the method of study, time and experience. The Institute offers both self-study and classroom-based learning, but the only way to gain the qualification is to go through the three CPSM exams and have the required level of experience in procurement.

Currently there is no option to use other qualifications (degree, post-graduate degree, etc.) to provide an exemption for exams.

3. ‘License to Practice’

Possibly the biggest difference in the accreditation offered between the CIPS and ISM is what is offered beyond the main qualifications.

For ISM, this is the ISM Mastery Model. The model is based around a set of 16 core competencies and more than 70 sub-competencies which are seen as critical for a successful career in procurement and supply. Further learning resources help take individuals and teams from the first level, ‘Fundamental’, right up to ‘Mastery’, helping to provide a level of standardisation in skills for the profession.

Where CIPS differentiates from ISM is in its chartership programme. CIPS’ ambition with this when it launched its chartership programme was to create a ‘license to practice’, similar to other professions. With procurement looking to achieve the same recognition as these other professions, chartership seems like something that many people may consider going forward.

So which is better?

In some areas the differences between the organisations and their respective qualifications are stark, in others they are slight. Despite these differences, it doesn’t mean that one qualification is better than the other, or that there is more positive benefit for long-term career prospects in being a member of one institution over the other.

This is because of the key thing that both have in common: international recognition as a gold standard accreditation for procurement and supply chain. CIPS and ISM have together raised the bar for procurement, providing standardisation in learning, development and qualifications, and applicable to all areas, industries, sectors and individuals involved in the profession.

Irrespective of which route you choose, by choosing to undertake professional development and further qualifications, you’re playing your part in advancing the procurement profession. The best thing you can do is look at the organisation and qualification that suits you best and go for that. If everyone takes this step, then procurement will be the ultimate winner!

Is Your Contract Rollout Turning Into A Psychodrama?

The critical moment between signing a contract and handing it over to the business seems like the perfect time to take the hands off the wheel and celebrate. But don’t pop that champagne just yet – this is a time for procurement pro’s to shine! Ensure you remain front and center for the contract roll out and implementation to make sure you deliver the value identified during the sourcing process!


You’ve gone through the pain of a long, drawn out sourcing and negotiation process. You’re exhausted. The business agrees that you’ve selected the right supplier to award the business to. After all, they signed off on the decision…right???  Oh no. The ink isn’t even dry on the contract when the backstabbing and psychodrama begins!

5 contract implementation pitfalls

Read on to find out the top 5 reasons contract implementations go wrong and what you can do to get it back on track.  

1. Lost your true north

The supplier is delivering the services in accordance with the new contract, but the reactions seem mixed.  Some people are happy and some people are not. Key stakeholders are offering completely different views of how successful this project implementation has been.

  • Pitfall: The problem definition or opportunity statement was not correctly nailed down. 
  • Resolution: Facilitate a group meeting about the purpose and scope of the contract. Reset expectations about what the supplier has been contracted to provide. You may be able to get the supplier to make minor adjustments to appease some of the requests.
  • Tip: Ensure the focus is on resetting stakeholders back to the shared outcome and not individual desires or opinions.

2. People don’t like change, get in front of this

New people have come out of the woodwork that suddenly have an opinion about how things should have been structured or worse – who you should have chosen and they’re kicking up a fuss. Drama!

  • Pitfall: The wrong people were involved or the right people weren’t in the room.
  • Resolution: Most big project changes or contracts need a reference group or project team to help the implementation phase bed in for the first 6 months to a year. Offer to bring these people into the project team and get them involved with future reviews. It’s hard to complain if you’re part of the group….right? 
  • Tip: Make sure there is a solid communications and change management plan taking people along the journey and communicating the major project steps. Try to think of ways to involve end users to gain maximum chances of buy in e.g. trialing new furniture for a fit out project or sampling coffee for a new catering contract.

3. You specified the how

Things aren’t quite right and you can’t really put your finger on it. Things aren’t happening like you planned. The issues aren’t disappearing. Your managers aren’t as wowed as they were expecting and they’re starting to ask questions.

  • Pitfall: You got what you asked for and that’s the problem. Buyers can sometimes feel the need to define not only what they need, but also how the supplier should solve this problem.
  • Resolution: The market will respond to what you put out, so be careful what you ask for. Leave as much room as possible for suppliers to make their mark and do what they do best, which is to know their stuff and their industry. Ensure you leave room for creative solutions, suitable alternatives and innovation.
  • Tip: If you’re trying to solve a problem have you nailed down the right root issue? Try the five whys concept to ensure you buy what you really need

4. Contract Management, what’s that?

The project team disappear once the contract is signed, they high five each other as they head back to their day jobs and slap the documentation on the contract manager’s desk. You check in one month later and the contract isn’t working – complaints are rolling in from all fronts.

  • Pitfall: Often the time investment of managing a contract particularly at the mobilisation phase is not properly scoped out and/or other priorities creep in. 
  • Resolution: Ensure the project team sticks around for the all important start-up and that the contract manager is in the sourcing project from the beginning. You’d be surprised how often this simple action is not undertaken.
  • Tip: Keep the regular project meetings for the first three months of the contract. Ensure you try to realistically gauge how much time this contract will take to manage and get the right cover.

5. Different supplier but same result, what happened?

This contract was meant to deliver real changes, but a year or two in, it’s just the same service and results the last supplier gave. What happened to the agreement of innovation, ideas, incentives for high KPI scores and phase 2 of implementing a new system?

  • Pitfall: There are a few things that could be going on here: either the process asked for a whole lot of things the buyer wasn’t ready for, or didn’t have the commercial readiness to be able to realistically achieve; The supplier hasn’t been managed or given any clear direction; Protracted contract negotiations stifled innovation, goodwill and squeezed margins.
  • Resolution: Time for an honest 360 feedback meeting. Be clear on what you want and what you are able to achieve.
  • Tip: It’s great to have thirst and hunger to do things differently, but be careful not to over scope what you need or what the organisation is ready for. If you aren’t going to portion risk evenly then don’t enter into a pain / gain share model (for example).

Next time you’re part of a large project team or leading a procurement process that will result in a new supplier, make sure you think ahead and mitigate these potential pitfalls to ensure your next contract implementation ain’t no drama llama.

How To Keep Your Career On Track During A Recession

With the world economy in such a state, layoffs, redundancies and furloughs are commonplace – but even so, you can appear indispensable to your organisation.


There’s no denying that this year has been a year that will be remembered, and definitely not for the right reasons. Many of us know of, or personally know, someone who has lost their job, which is unsurprisingly given that more people have lost their jobs this year than during the Great Depression. Fortunately, many of us in procurement and supply chain have been protected thus far, but we do not know for how long. So is there anything we can do to ensure we keep our career on track and avoid being laid off? 

When you work for large corporations as many of us do, it can be easy to feel powerless against a potential redundancy. But rest assured, there are a few significant things you can do to keep your career (and your job). Here’s what you can do to keep afloat when everyone else seems to be on the sinking ship: 

1. Be visible

In a perfect world, you would be judged on your work and your work alone. But career success requires so much more than that: to learn and grow, you’re also expected to volunteer for extra projects and committees, network, pursue development opportunities, and so much more. 

Doing so makes you more ‘visible’ to more people, but it also makes your effort far more visible. And ultimately, if more people value you and your input, it’s more likely that if the time comes to lay people off, your job will be seen as essential. 

Of course, visibility has taken on a whole new meaning this year. You may not be able to show up in person anymore, but if you’re looking to keep your career on track, volunteer for that committee you might have skipped in the past. Be as engaged as possible, even when meetings bore you. And make time to connect with colleagues, even if it’s just for a quick social video chat. 

Work is not a popularity contest, but the more connections you have, the more likely you will be to stay. 

2. Be optimistic 

Being optimistic in this environment is challenging at best, impossible at most. And why should you bother? It’s doom and gloom for most of the world for the foreseeable future, with no real end date. 

Could optimism actually help your career, though? Science says yes. 

Research into who survives massive layoffs shows some surprising results. In a nutshell, being optimistic at work is important for one key reason: people will be more likely to want to work with you. In business, people are almost twice as likely to want to work with someone they consider congenial, over someone who is more capable, yet less likeable. 

When a company is considering layoffs, they will consider how much work each individual or department needs to do. If you’re optimistic and great to work with, you’ll likely get the lion’s share, and will be less likely to be able to be replaced. 

3. Support your leader

When times get tough, it’s tempting to make an enemy out of your boss. After all, they often have a say on whether or not you’ll keep your job, and sometimes are in the terrible position of having to deliver you the bad news – while keeping their own job, which can feel crushingly unfair. 

Yet if you’re looking to keep your career on track during a recession, going dark on your boss is not advised. 

Managers, just like everyone else, suffer through recessions and not many (if any) enjoy laying people off. Recognising this, and showing empathy for them, can help create an important emotional bond. In turn, this bond will help them see you as mature and resilient, and hopefully, all things being equal, an asset to the company, and one that is not easily replaced.  

Keeping your career on track in this economy is certainly a challenge, and sometimes you simply go into survival mode. But remember, you’re not powerless. There are things you can do every day to show how invaluable you are to your company, so next year – hopefully – you can not just survive, but thrive. 

How To Get The Most Out Of The Big Ideas Summit This Year

It’s the digital event of the year that everyone’s been talking about and recommending – so how do you make the most of it? Here’s 7 ways you can maximise every avenue of opportunity the Big Ideas Summit has in store.


You all know what we’re talking about when we describe this. You registered for the biggest procurement event of the year; the one that every industry expert out there says you simply can’t miss. You’re determined to get the most out of it.

But it’s virtual. Your day is still packed with meetings. You plan to login from home (with all the distractions that come with it.) And your to-do list is a hundred items long.

You’re afraid that this crucial professional development opportunity might pass you by … But not this year. You deserve this opportunity – and want to make the most of it.

For anyone out there who has ever felt a little intimidated by events, this year’s online Big Ideas Summit will provide you with unparalleled (and many would say, easier!) opportunities to learn, grow and network. But it will also be different.

Over 1,100 of your peers have signed up alongside you. We have an action-packed agenda including sessions on  how to think the unthinkable, understand the new risk landscape, protect your career and much more. 

To get the most out of the event, you need to prepare. But don’t worry, the prep is quick and easy.

Here’s how to get the most out of Big Ideas 2020:  

1. Register for the Event

Once you’ve registered (if you haven’t, do so here), you’ll receive an email inviting you to the Event Hub. To accept this invitation, you’ll need to click on the link and enter your first and last name, and email address you registered with. You’ll then receive an event code, which you can use to enter the event (note that this code is only valid for 24 hours).

2. Block off your calendar

Let your team, boss, family and internal stakeholders know what you’re up to. The best way to benefit from the conference is to give it your time and attention.

3. Explore  the Event Hub

You’ll find all of our great sessions in the Event Hub. Each session has its own unique link, and when you click it, it will open a new viewing screen on your browser (or phone/tablet etc.). Take time to review the sessions in advance to ensure you don’t miss the one you most want to attend. 

4. Partner networking

Within the Event Hub, there are also Partner Virtual booths. These information-rich booths enable you to network and get to know our partners (online!)
Simply click the booths to enter. 

5. Live networking sessions

There are 2 live 20-minute facilitated networking sessions, to cover all of your networking needs.

6. Share ideas and ask questions

Have you ever had a burning question during a presentation, only to have forgotten it by the time the session ended? Cue another benefit of a digital event! This year, you’ll be able to comment on each session while it’s happening, so you never forget a question or forgo an opportunity to have your say. 

7. Bring it home

Okay, this is more of a post-event action. Take notes, share ideas and make a concrete plan to bring your learnings back home.

And as always, we’ll be with you every step of the way. If at any point you need any help, reach out to [email protected]

This year, we need more Big Ideas more than ever. We can’t wait to see all of your virtual smiling faces and help you dream big.

5 Ways to Use Your CIPS Membership to Keep Your Job

During times of uncertainty, you need to make yourself stand out to help you keep your job. This is where your CIPS membership is worth its weight in gold.


If you are one of the over 200,000 procurement professionals globally with a CIPS membership, the chances are high that you are studying, or have studied, towards your MCIPS qualification. You may even have started your chartership journey through Continuous Professional Development (CPD). As said previously, there are great benefits available to those who are lucky enough to be in this position.

There will come a time in your career where holding these qualifications will prove even more valuable than before. In times of uncertainty, either globally or even just for your organisation, belts will be tightened, and headcounts will be reduced.

And your FCIPS, MCIPS and/or Chartership could be the means by which you weather the storm.

Can qualifications help me keep my job?

As procurement and supply chain follow other professions down the route of chartership, qualifications will increasingly be sought and expected by employers and CPOs. There is an expectation in role development that procurement professionals will have, or at very least be studying towards, these qualifications.

Leaders of the profession both expect and are expected to have MCIPS and will look to build teams in this image. When it comes to times of turmoil, not having qualifications may result in you being the one without a chair when the music stops.

How, then, can the time and effort put into your exams and CPD help you be the one to hold on to your job? Here are our five top reasons.

1. A willingness to learn

When it comes to your qualifications and job, it’s not enough to settle with what you have and where you are. Your CIPS membership and CPD show your organisation that you are invested in your career and have a keenness to better yourself and keep working.

Your willingness to put in extra time and effort to earn and keep these qualifications is not only a benefit to you, but to your organisation too. Not only that, but self-study and CPD show you can direct yourself independently, something that will be noticed by your managers and may be important when it comes to that next round of promotions or cuts.

2. Up to date knowledge and training

Earning your qualifications based on specific exam-based knowledge is one thing, but subsequently keeping that knowledge up to date is something else entirely. Your CIPS membership, complete with its numerous sources of information and learning, is a great way to ensure that your knowledge is always on point.

You will continue to learn new skills, and understand key industry trends and requirements in the wider procurement profession. You can then bring this new knowledge and concepts back to your organisation, helping to keep it up to date, and potentially even providing it with a competitive advantage.

3. Show yourself as a committed professional

Organisations continue to recognise the importance of professional qualifications, CPD and networking for their procurement teams. For those who are wanting to undertake further studies, organisations are increasingly aiding this by choosing to invest in their employees’ studies.

However, beyond the monetary investment, organisations will recognise your commitment to them and procurement as a career by choosing to further your studies. Those people who don’t go down this route may not be seen as committed in the same way, which could count against them in the future.

4. Part of a community and network

An important part of expanding our own sphere of knowledge is networking with peers and collaborating in procurement-led, highly interactive communities, like CIPS and Procurious. Information from textbooks can help provide a foundation, but the real benefit to you and your organisation comes from understanding what has been successful in the real world.

With a global membership of over 200,000 procurement and supply chain professionals, the CIPS network is a cornucopia of ideas and knowledge. Being an active part in this network means you bring your learning, as well as ideas from others, into your organisation, increasing your value and future potential.

5. A strong future prospect

A willingness to learn and then keep that learning up to date. Commitment to your chosen profession and your organisation. A wealth of knowledge and experience at your fingertips. On top of this all, professional membership and qualifications. Having some of this will help your career; having all of it will mark you out as a strong future prospect in any organisation.

Your qualifications will open up new routes and job roles and ultimately make you a better candidate for promotion, rather than a candidate for headcount reduction.

While there are no guarantees that your CIPS membership will mean you keep your job, it provides a compelling case as to why it’s in the interests of your organisation to hold on to you and support your studies. With most organisations asking for MCIPS for new roles and recruitment, you would question why you wouldn’t study towards it given the opportunity. It’s the start of the journey to a long, and hopefully prosperous, career in procurement.

Three Reasons Why Procurement Has A Beautiful Future

Why should you be excited about procurement’s future? Three experts weigh in as we close out 2020 and look forward to a new year.


Now is the perfect time to be in procurement.

Think about it – when have we ever enjoyed so much trust, influence, and freedom to make changes?

We asked three experts why they’re excited about procurement’s future.

We can protect our companies 

Procurement is finally shedding its image as a support function. Now the c-suite is learning how much strategic value we can add.

Just ask Dr. Jonnie Penn, an artificial intelligence expert at the University of Cambridge and keynote speaker at the 2020 Big Ideas Summit.

He says the last 40 years of supply chain management were characterised by a push for efficiency.

“We see now that that’s too fragile a metric amid deglobalisation,” Penn says. 

“You need to start to incorporate other measures that give you security in the resilience of your system. 

“In the past you might have made a push for weekly or monthly planning. We’re now looking at a shift to continuous planning.” 

That puts supply chain management forward strategic leaders, able to prevent future disruption.

And the c-suite desperately needs that help.

Just look at one pharmaceutical CEO, who predicts the industry will move from global supply chains to more localised providers.

You have the opportunity to use data in a similar way to improve resilience.

But you might have to think about the way you see data, says Penn.

Great data meets three criteria:

  • Real-time
  • Structured in a way that’s easy to consolidate
  • Combines information from lots of different areas

Penn calls this ‘thick’ data, “which means that as opposed to just hiring let’s say a data scientist to crunch your numbers you’re also bringing in remote sensor engineers or ethnographers, sociologists.”

Those different perspectives are crucial to finding the best solutions.

We can drive innovation  

And that includes collaborating with your suppliers. 

Just look at Apple.

When Steve Jobs unveiled the first iPhone in 2007, the screen was plastic.

Yet the next day, Jobs noticed the screen was covered in scratches and called his VP of Operations, Jeff Williams, demanding a glass screen for the official release.

Williams said it couldn’t be done in just six months. Every glass prototype they tried had smashed, and it would take years to create a shatter-resistant, thin glass.

But Jobs insisted.

So Williams worked with speciality manufacturing company Corning to create damage-resistant Gorilla Glass in time for the launch.

Now every smartphone in the world uses Gorilla Glass.

It’s interesting to note Williams joined Apple as Head of Worldwide Procurement. He’s now COO and tipped to replace CEO Tim Cook someday.

That proves procurement teams can meet specific business needs by working with suppliers to innovate, says Dr. Marcell Vollmer, Partner and Director at Boston Consulting Group

He says every procurement function of the future will drive supply innovations – including saving our environment.

Dr. Penn agrees. 

“To go it alone is just not sustainable,” Penn says. “You need to look at building common frameworks and using standardisation.”

And that includes sustainability.

We can save our environment

After all, Penn cites McKinsey research that 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and 90% of the impact on biodiversity come from the way supply chains are managed.

Depressing, right? It’s actually great news. It means we can have a huge influence on creating a sustainable supply chain – together.

Penn uses the example of the 240 million packages sent daily. Of that, 40% is dead space.

But new technology can scan each object and use optimal packaging. 

“That means that you can reduce the 40% air and ultimately all the derivative effects, down the supply chain of the plastic use and shipping and storage requirements.”

Another example is monitoring factory emissions in real time by combining satellite imagery with machine learning.

Clearly, there are countless ways supply chain professionals can make the planet better, says Supply Chain Revolution CEO Sheri Hinish.

“Supply chains are the conduit for building a better world; designing a better world,” Hinish says.

“We can come from different backgrounds, different parts of the world but at our core, we fundamentally want the same things. 

“So, it’s real and when you think about collaborating within a global context… this is what wakes me up every morning – to create a world that’s bearable, viable and equitable.”

Our beautiful future

That’s why all three of our experts say procurement has a beautiful future.

Combine your skills with technology advancements, and you’ll have endless opportunities to lead significant change.

And if that seems daunting, don’t worry; you’ve got experts on your side.

“Feel free to be in touch as you develop your data strategy and your AI strategy to accomplish your sustainability and resilience goals, says Dr. Penn.

Ace Your Next Negotiation – Uncover Your Suppliers’ Secrets

Ever been to a therapist and felt like they’ve read you like a book? Uncover their secrets in this article and harness your own superpowers. Got a big meeting or negotiation coming up? Learn how your adversaries and your team tick to make sure you stay in control.


My partner has a superpower. 

When he opens the front door to a stranger he can tell what kind of day they’ve had, how they feel about themselves and what they think of him. He’s a therapist, and honing these skills day after day through years of human interaction have saved him (and his clients)  hours of questions and warm up chit chat. 

He can cut straight to the chase and use their shared time in the most effective way that meets their needs. 

They often feel relieved, understood and grateful that they don’t have to take the first step of opening up and being vulnerable.

It gives him a steer on what tone he needs to take, what topics they may need to explore and what the weather is like in their emotional forecast.

A therapist has an arsenal of tools ready to deploy – this super quick scanning ability means he’s on the front foot and taking charge before he’s even said hello.

Master your own superpowers

The good news for procurement and supply chain pros around the world is that these skills can be learned. We’ve all seen the TedTalks and infographics reminding us of how much we communicate nonverbally through posture, eye contact and even vibes. A therapist’s superpower helps to demonstrate how much untapped potential there is in the way we hold ourselves and once you learn the signs, you can feel like a mind reader.

Imagine walking into a negotiation clocking every single person in the room  based on the seats they’ve chosen to sit in, the set of their jaw, their gaze (fixed, nervous, darting around) and the colours they’re wearing. This includes your own team as well, it can help show who might need a bit of support, who’s at risk of spilling the beans and who might be the over-sharer. 

Having the best negotiation plan in the history of procurement does not mitigate against the might of the ever unpredictable human being. We’re people, not machines and that means we can be unpredictable but paradoxically we will often have a billboard above our heads announcing our inner emotional state.  We just need to learn to read the signs.

Experiment in your everyday life

Start practicing in your daily life by observing people around you. Look at how people hold themselves, their posture, their eyes, their energy levels, their expression when they’re talking to someone else. You can do this in the lift, on the bus, in conversation with a loved one and when you’re walking down the street. Observing people is not the same as judging, don’t make this mistake. It’s important that you are approaching this exercise from a place of detachment, objectivity and kindness.

David Attenborough ain’t got nothing on you

Once you’ve narrated your own nature documentary about humans you’ve stared at on the bus, then progress to unpack what they’re telling you nonverbally. Start to think about what the expressions might mean, what they could be communicating and what this means for you.

ActionMeaningStrategy
Posture: slouching, or intensely concentrating – furrowed brow, arms crossedLook at the symbol beneath the gestures. Slouching conveys being relaxed but too relaxed comes across as unreliable. Concentrating can come across as angry which can put you in the box of “unapproachable” Arms crossed means the person is not buying in to what you’re saying or they feel defensiveThe slouchy person can’t be relied on to win people over when the razzle dazzle is needed but would be good to talk to before you do a presentation to make sure you’re feeling relaxed

Speech
Fast talking and being overly friendly may indicate someone that feels the need to have everyone like them.A people pleaser can be great for assisting with establishing connections and winning people over but they may not be best placed to head to head on the details or key issues.

The ultimate survival guide (we got you)

Follow these neutral gestures and postures to ensure you’re the cool, calm and collected procurement pro at all times.

  1. Always sit up straight.
  1. Relax your face and voice. A tip is to take a big breath, smile, put your tongue behind your top two teeth (and keeping your mouth closed) exhale gently but firmly, it’s a great way to calm yourself down on the spot.
  1. If you’re a fidgeter, then restrict yourself to only one item on the table.
  1. Maintain direct, but relaxed eye contact. If you smile it will soften your gaze.
  1. Be comfortable in silence and don’t feel the need to fill the space.

Level up and feel the power!

Got a huge presentation or meeting to nail? Then lock in these two strategies from Forbes:

  1. Power priming. Think of a past event where you were successful, recall this event and spend time in that feeling. Soaking yourself in this feeling means you can recall it when you need to.
  1. Power pose. There is a lot of research that shows if you strike a particular pose like standing with your legs and arms wide open for 2 minutes, it will stimulate the hormone linked to power and dominance (testosterone).

Follow our body language hacks to ensure your negotiation or big event goes down as a winner.

Do you have any tried-and-true strategies? Comment below!

5 Ways To Separate The Successful Supply Chains From The Rest

New computers can analyse a million rows of data in minutes. So why not let the computer do the heavy lifting? As a supply chain professional of the future, you won’t be manually processing data.  You will have data you can trust at your fingertips, as well as meaningful insights.  The rest will be up to you! IBM’s Takshay Aggarwal explains.


In the future, what will separate the successful supply chains from the rest? 

Procurious Founder Tania Seary sat down with Takshay Aggarwal from IBM to get his take on where we are, and where we are going.



Everything has changed

In 20 years of supply chain experience, Takshay has never seen a supply and demand shock at the same time.

“It’s completely changed how supply chain planning is done,” Takshay says.

Before, people used historical data to project demand – usually with a 5-10% variability or 1-2% percent for really mature organisations.  

But even with a high level of accuracy, too many companies were unsure which supplies were coming when. 

“Processes were so monthly and weekly orientated,” Takshay adds. “There was no sense of response; it was all about, ‘We’re used to this stepwise process and will get to it when we get to it.”

The result? Slow response time and lost sales. And reaction time was seriously hampered by years of cost cutting.

“An easy analogy is that you can cut and cut the fat to the bone, but when you need to run, where is the muscle?” Takshay says.

Sensing the market

That’s not true for all organisations, of course. Some companies invested in the right technology to detect changes in the market, which enabled them to respond quickly.

Takshay uses the example of two big retailers during the early days of the pandemic.  

“One retailer had sensing and response capabilities,” Takshay explains. “They secured all the available supplies in the market. Their shelves were stocked and their sales were booming.”

On the other hand, the second retailer’s supply chain officer was slow to respond. “They had traditional ways of doing stuff and their shelves were empty.” 

The difference between the two? “One supply chain officer is now promoted to the board and the other is finding a new job.” 

That’s why it’s so crucial to have the tools in place to detect market fluctuation and respond.

Looking at data differently

Going forward, how will you prepare for disruption – not only for your suppliers, but your suppliers’ suppliers?

The solution is incorporating non-traditional data for demand planning, Takshay says.

“Let’s say a discretionary spend category like electronics or fashion; you need to understand how unemployment is panning out in certain areas because that determines the footfall in your store,” Takshay says.

Non-traditional data includes areas of demographics like looking at unemployment or how a disease is spreading.

“You will start seeing a lot of what we call demand sensing in the near term, and driver-based forecasting which is trying to understand larger drivers in terms of promotions, in terms of macroeconomic factors,” Takshay explains.

“I think that’s where we’ll see demand sensing capabilities, like trying to understand the near term impact of weather or demographics and how they affect demand.”

Spreadsheets won’t cut it

Technology will also change how you use that non-traditional data, Takshay says.

That’s because higher computational power creates the ability to process data at lightning speed.

“The basic math hasn’t changed, but what has changed is how fast you can ingest that data,” Takshay says.

Think of it this way. How long would it take you to analyse a million rows in an Excel spreadsheet? Yet for some of these new models, a million rows is nothing.

Artificial intelligence can quickly process large amounts of data, making it easier to extract meaningful data. 

It will also be easier to bring in different sources of data – as and when –  they’re relevant.

For example, data about the pandemic spread might be a big consideration now, but six months from now it might not be relevant (fingers crossed!)

Instead, you may be more interested to ingest data at scale about economic recovery. AI can help you make sense of a huge amount of data and understand correlations – something that used to take an army of data scientists to uncover.

Welcome to efficiency

That ability to analyse vast quantities of data will also make demand planning a lot easier.

“If you ask any demand planners, 60 to 70% of their work today is about cleansing and harmonising data, and 20-30% is figuring out what it’s saying,” says Takshay.

Now, technology can eliminate much of that manual processing. In fact, Takshay says IBM estimates around 40 to 60% of that work will be covered.

“Now imagine if you’re a demand planner and you don’t have to go through those daily tasks to get the data cleansed,” Takshay says. 

Making it personal

So what does the future hold for supply chain?

Takshay predicts consumer demand is moving toward mass personalisation. The challenge for procurement teams will be supporting that personalisation in production, without losing efficiency or driving up costs.

“Ten years from now, we will be talking more about how we can better understand the consumer,” Takshay says.

“Everything will be done by machine. Supply chain may become irrelevant. It all becomes about mass personalisation so that’s where we start putting our efforts.”

That’s why human empathy will be an even more essential skill. Quantum computing could eliminate 80% of today’s procurement tasks, so our greater contribution is using human emotion to meet customer needs.

Hear Takshay’s full talk with Tania Seary in our exclusive webcast series The Future of Supply Chain Now.

What Will The 4 Hot Topics In Procurement Be In 2030?

Look at your latest supplier contract. Does it specifically mention Zoom catch-ups? If not, why not? Sally Guyer from World Commerce & Contracting talks with Procurious about getting the most from suppliers and technology.

Have a look at your latest supplier contract. Does it specifically mention communication like regular Zoom catch-ups or phone calls? If not, you’re missing a trick.

Procurious Founder Tania Seary recently spoke with Sally Guyer, Global CEO of World Commerce & Contracting on getting the most out of supplier relationships and predictions about the future of procurement. 



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It’s been a wild year, but disruption isn’t unique to 2020. 

“I think it’s really interesting because there have been numerous supply chain upheavals inflicted by disaster in the last decade,” Sally says.

“You’ve got things like the volcanic eruption in Iceland, Japanese earthquake and tsunami, the Thailand floods, numerous hurricanes, not to mention the global financial crisis which also needs to sit on that list; yet we don’t seem to have learned very much,” Sally explains. 

“Most companies still found themselves totally unprepared for the COVID-19 pandemic.”

After this crisis is over, companies will fall into two categories: those that don’t do anything and hope that a disruption like this never happens again, and those that map their supply networks.

Supply networks

You should know how your suppliers (and your suppliers’ suppliers) fit together, which is why mapping out your network is so useful.

Companies who already made the effort to document their network acted quickly when the pandemic spread. Other companies were floundering and reactive. 

“We know from our research that many organisations typically don’t see beyond the first tier of suppliers, or possibly tier two,” Sally says.

“If we ever doubted the importance of visibility, the pandemic has provided a dramatic example of why it’s absolutely essential to have insight into sources of supply.”

Sally is seeing leading organisations require suppliers to participate in supply chain mapping efforts as part of their contract.

And it serves an important part of rebuilding.

“[We’re] moving away from the linear and much more to a recognition that supply networks’ supply ecosystems are a huge number of organisations all interacting with one another where there needs to be fluidity amongst them all. 

“And that’s essential to accelerate and support recovery.”

Sustainable cashmere

Companies are also investing more heavily in technology to help them gain end-to-end visibility.

Blockchain technology is particularly noteworthy.

Sally gives the example of tracing Mongolian cashmere production. The country is famous for its luxurious fibres – producing nearly a fifth of the world’s raw cashmere

And even though cashmere is considered natural and sustainable, soaring consumer demand is fueling overgrazing and damaging the land. 

So Toronto-based Convergence.tech and the UN teamed up to create an app for Mongolian farmers, backed by blockchain technology. 

Now the UN is able to interact with over 70 different herders and eight cooperatives through a simple app.

Farmers use the Android app to register and tag their cashmere. Then their location is pinned on a map to allow for end-to-end tracking. The UN works with the farmers and other producers along the supply chain to improve sustainability.

“Farmers are willing to have their goods marked in return for training on better practises, and then open markets pay fair prices for truly sustainable and high-quality cashmere,” Sally explains.

“Everybody benefits. Everybody wins.”

Better contracts, better relationships

Another way technology is transforming the supplier/client relationship is through communication.

Sally advises all clients to include communication obligations in supplier contracts.  

“It comes down to simple things like if we want to do video conferencing does your organisation support Zoom or not, because if I do and you don’t then [that’s an issue],” Sally says.

It’s not rocket science. All good relationships hinge on good communication, says Sally.

“Fundamentally, partnerships are founded on robust and clear communication, and you know I always talk about professional relationships in the same context as I talk about personal relationships,” Sally says.

“If you don’t have clear communication with your friends, with your partner, with whomever is around you, then you are not going to have a very successful relationship.”

While you can’t provide for every eventuality in your contracts, you need a robust framework to support the relationship which means communication needs to be at the top of the agenda.

Predicting the future

The year is 2030. What are the hot topics in procurement? Here are Sally’s predictions:

1) Sustainability

“We’re still a long way from creating our sustainable planet and it has to be something that we all continue to champion,” Sally says.

“We need to be promoting best practises to reach the next level where we’re actually starting to give back. Not just to seek neutrality but actually give back.”

2) Social inclusion

“I can’t imagine that social inclusion wouldn’t be important in 2030,” Sally says. “Perhaps a scorecard of corporate performance on social inclusion and social value.”

3) Technology

“Numbers suggest we’re only using 30% of the data that we are producing,” Sally says. 

“And if organisations are genuinely on a journey of continuous improvement then they need to be using data and the likes of artificial intelligence natural language processing if they’re going to continue to advance.”

4) Integration

“We need to organise for integration,” Sally adds. “We need to break down the internal barriers that exist.

“We all operate in silos. We’ve got organisations who have a buy side and sell side and they have no idea what’s going on on either side of the organisation. So those companies are starting to look at how they create an integrated trading relationships function.”

Sally Guyer can be seen in our exclusive series The Future of Supply Chain Now.

“I Want To Break Free” – Is This Procurement & Supply Chain’s 2020 Theme Song/Anthem?

We asked our LinkedIn community for their top pandemic anthems, and the result was an awesome playlist!


Owing to the myriad Supply Chain disruptions this year, many of us suddenly found that the world was no longer our oyster – or if it was, it clamped shut and trapped us inside. On top of Supply Chain chaos, we had to deal with our own incarceration.

Were you Happy like Pharrel or, despite all your rage, still just a Rat in a Cage like Smashing Pumpkins? Did you Always Look On the Bright Side of Life a la Monty Python, or did you swing from Sia’s Chandelier?

Perhaps it wasn’t The End of the World as We Know It but Lord knows you wanted to break free.

Music can either placate your mood or provoke it; it can augment your voice or do all the talking for you. In whichever case, certain songs will already be part of your daily COVID-19 landscape.

We asked our LinkedIn community for their Supply Chain anthems – and here’s the top 10:

Highway to Hell – AC/DC

– Peter Rand, Mastercard

No stop signs, speed limit
Nobody’s gonna slow me down
Like a wheel, gonna spin it
Nobody’s gonna mess me around

When confronted with a crisis, do you let your hair down, throw your glass in the fireplace and yell “game on!”? You crank this rockin’ classic and take on the world!

Then you realise (as some of us did) these are problems we’ve never faced from a catastrophe we never imagined:

Help! – The Beatles

– Peter Rand, Mastercard

97% percent of organisations we surveyed reported a supply chain disruption – and few of us had ever seen anything like it. So if you found yourself thinking:

Help! I need somebody!
Help! Not just anybody!
Help! I need someone!
Help!

… You weren’t the only one!

One – U2

– Gale Daikoku, SAP

It wasn’t one single person or organisation who saved the world: the COVID-19 Pandemic was a textbook case of Procurement and Supply Chains working together:

We’re one, but we’re not the same
We get to carry each other, carry each other

But with the huge pressures of work and the stifling restrictions on freedom, you could be forgiven for not basking in solidarity.

So Sick – Ne-Yo

– Tim Elliott, McLaren Automotive

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG2U2sjshTM

(It’s ridiculous) It’s been months, and for some reason I just
(Can’t get over us) And I’m stronger than this
(Enough is enough) No more walkin ’round with my head down
I’m so over bein’ blue

While working from home may be an introvert’s dream come true, for the rest of us the novelty is wearing thin. We all know this feeling of being locked up – especially Melburnians! Speaking of …

Locked Up – Akon

Warning: contains strong language

– Tim Elliott, McLaren Automotive

I’m locked up, they won’t let me out
No, they won’t let me out

There may not be grey walls and orange clothes, but isolation can still give off those incarceration vibes. Of course we can do most things from home, but … 

I Want To Break Free – Queen

– Rhylee Nowell, The Faculty

While our Supply Chains may be more resilient than ever, we can only take so much:

But life still goes on
I can’t get used to living without, living without
Living without you by my side
I don’t want to live alone, hey
God knows, got to make it on my own 

Or do you?

Bridge Over Troubled Water – Simon and Garfunkel

– Tania Seary, Founder, Procurious; Stephanie Shrader, Pridesports

when times get rough
And friends just can’t be found
Like a bridge over troubled water
I will lay me down

Just as one Supply Chain helped another, all sorts of people put their hands up to help.

With A Little Help From My Friends – The Beatles

– Imelda Walsh, Manager, The Source

https://youtu.be/0C58ttB2-Qg

What do I do when my love is away?
Does it worry you to be alone?
How do I feel by the end of the day?
Are you sad because you’re on your own?
No, I get by with a little help from my friends

When your personal network is as strong as your business network, its support takes on inertia of its own.

Don’t Worry Be Happy – Bobby McFerrin

– Greg Parkinson, Director, Turner & Towsend

The right frame of mind is the key to success: a little mindfulness, coupled with an Attitude of Gratitude a la Nicky Abdinor, goes a long way.

Thus set up for success, soon we’ll be poised to take on the world again:

I Want To Be A Billionaire – Bruno Mars

– Matthew Hadgraft, The Faculty

(Clean Version)

Oh every time I close my eyes
I see my name in shining lights
A different city every night oh right
I swear the world better prepare
For when I’m a billionaire

Keep your dreams, goals, ambitions and plans intact because all this will change. Every Procurement and Supply Chain executive knows the importance of a Business Continuity Plan – make sure your own plans are articulated, because who knows what opportunities the future will bring?

Do you have any suggestions for additional songs? Comment below.