Tag Archives: networks

How P2P will Become the Technology of the Future

Discover the value that a procure-to-pay (P2P) system can deliver to your business today and over the next five years.


The evolution of procure-to-pay (P2P) has accelerated dramatically over the past few years. And we can expect the pace to pick up further over the years to come. Originally, procure-to-pay / purchase-to-pay technology was seen as a way to connect procurement to finance via accounts payable, and as such it started life in the form of expensive and rather inflexible bolt-ons to on premise enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. No wonder that for many years, P2P did not have the greatest of reputations, even among procurement professionals.

In the early 2000s, dedicated eProcurement systems emerged. Yet, many large enterprises still do all their purchasing and accounts payables through their ERP systems, even though this leaves much of the process highly dependent on paper in the handling of purchases orders, requisitions, goods receipts and invoicing. Or, in one word, routine. Many ERP implementations even lack a requisitioning facility and a means to communicate electronically with suppliers.

As to accounts payable, in many organisations that do not have a dedicated, built for purpose procure-to-pay solution, vendor invoices still arrive by mail or email and the data must be keyed manually into an ERP or other finance system. If the benefits of touchless invoicing were not already apparent, they have certainly become so in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The other major issue that continues to plague many organisations is our old friend, maverick spend (or off-contract buying), which is especially likely to occur when anyone looking to purchase items needed for everyday use is confronted with bureaucratic obstacles. Shopping online and submitting an expense report is much easier than submitting a requisition or purchase order that takes ages to process. Without a dedicated P2P system, maverick spend is difficult to monitor effectively. It results in lost money as employees buy at retail prices when you should be securing handsome bulk or wholesale discounts.

(Although worse than that, it forces happy-go-lucky procurement professionals into the role of jobsworths …)

And heaven knows, after years of online shopping with the likes of Amazon, corporate buyers expect the option to order online and enjoy an e-shopping experience comparable to the one they enjoy as private consumers. They expect an experience that is user-friendly, intuitive, and frictionless. Running low on stationery? Simply pick items from a catalog, review the shopping cart and place the order. And maybe pay with a V-card (single user account) number.

This can all be done via a procurement department’s P2P solution – against contracts negotiated with preferred suppliers. The P2P solution allows end-users to shop and track orders as easily as if they were shopping online, with the added benefit that all the information the procurement department needs is captured too, giving greater transparency. Plus, if the P2P solution is integrated with upstream processes such as contracts management and sourcing, the ability to monitor supplier performance against negotiated terms and non-price terms and conditions.

What you should look for in P2P now

A few years ago, people were still asking if procure-to-pay automation is worth it. I think that case has now been definitively answered. Especially if you wish to demonstrate the value of procurement – your value – to the business.

A P2P software suite integrates and automates the entire back-office lifecycle of requisitioning, purchasing, receiving, paying, and accounting for indirect goods and services. By creating standard workflows between buyers, procurement and accounting departments, a P2P solution should provide more transparency into, and control over, indirect spend and should create a more congenial relationship between all stakeholders. SaaS technology accessed in the cloud, such as the JAGGAER ONE suite, has made affordable, flexible and technically versatile solutions P2P available. A major advantage of SaaS is the ability to update functionality and innovate continuously without affecting the normal day-to-day operation of the core solution.

What you should look for in future 

Over the coming years P2P will increasingly leverage artificial intelligence, natural language processing and robotic procurement automation to deliver an even better buying experience on the one hand, while further cutting costs, increasing efficiency, reducing risk and improving governance and insight on the other. Generally speaking, you can expect P2P solutions to be more open, network-oriented, autonomous, collaborative and intelligent.

Here are seven trends that I think you can reasonably expect to reshape P2P not in some distant future but between now and 2025.

·   It will be a more collaborative environment for all stakeholders (internal and external) with full compliance, validations and approvals. P2P and MRP systems will collaborate through direct material order and fulfilment; P2P and corporate treasury will collaborate to support cash flow planning and optimize working capital

·   It will be more autonomous by taking charge of routine tasks such as all forms payment management and processing, improving the productivity of the payment process and the financial health of the supply chain

·   It will empower open business networks bringing together the entire community of buyers and suppliers, integrating and accessing external services and market intelligence feeds

·   It will be interactive with smart assistants assisting you through guided buying, vendor management and other chores

·   Enhanced intelligence will enable P2P systems to act proactively on behalf of users learning from and using all data sources and knowledge to make improvement recommendations to all stakeholder activities and the P2P process

·   It will deliver win-win finance programs to buyers and suppliers, for example dynamic discounting and supply chain finance programs

·   The focus of P2P will shift further from savings to value, reinforcing procurement’s profile as a strategic partner to the business

Conversational systems for guided buying and vendor management

Let’s stop calling them chatbots! Digital or smart help organizations will increase efficiency and achieve high levels of P2P user adoption because of their easy interfaces and clear answers. AI combined with natural language processing (NLP) has opened the door to new, more natural, and more intuitive interfaces that stimulate conversation with humans. There are many uses for digital assistants in procurement – too many to list here. However, the central issue is that procurement specialists are increasingly dealing with vast quantities of data, which means that a lot of their time is spent looking for information rather than using it. They will enable procurement specialists to converse with their AI-powered procurement software, which will do the heavy lifting involved in finding the relevant information and making intelligent suggestions as to what actions need to be taken in specific situations.

Through machine learning the digital assistant will be able learn about your preferences and your organisation’s policies and procedures. A good example is guided buying, whereby a person who needs to buy something will interact with procurement via a conversation conducted by a digital assistant. Based on the procurement strategy (preferred suppliers, preferred items, contracts in place, history of purchases, etc.), the digital assistant will propose solutions, perhaps looking through huge volumes of catalog entries to identify specific products or suggest alternatives.

Digital assistants can also be deployed for handling queries from suppliers, avoiding a lot of back-and-forth correspondences. I think they will become more engaging and human-like in their interactions with you. That, after all, was the original promise of artificial intelligence. But nobody’s perfect, so if the digital assistant cannot find the right answer, it can of course direct the user to a genuine flesh and blood procurement professional (you, for instance).

What innovations would you like to see, or expect to see, in procure-to-pay over the next five years? Let us know in the comments below! Keep up with the latest innovations at the 2020 Global Big Ideas Summit.

Become The Translator for Your Procurement Network

You may have thousands of contacts in your professional network, but how many of them are you actually influencing?  

By Lemon Tree Images / Shutterstock

In the age of big data, “vanity metrics” are a plague that affect every profession. Anyone who has a website, for example, will know that page views and “likes” may make you feel good, but are very difficult to link with key business drivers.

Vanity metrics to watch out for in procurement might include measuring team activity, counting your total POs, your number of suppliers, or number of projects without actually measuring the value that they’re delivering. A team member who brags that they’ve had 100 meetings with key suppliers in the past six months is talking about a vanity metric, but if that same person provides numbers around the savings and other value flowing from those meetings, then we’re talking about real value. 

Online networking is another area rife with vanity metrics. No matter whether you have 500, 5000 or 10,000 connections across LinkedIn, Procurious and other platforms, your network risks being nothing more than a dormant asset unless you contribute. By “contribute”, I don’t mean that you “like” something they wrote or share photos of your holiday – I mean that you share your mastery, your insights and your experience. For the majority of us, it’s rare that we contribute meaningfully to our networks.    

Remove the collection addiction

I believe we have a collection addiction in the business world. In previous years we collected piles of business cards wrapped in rubber bands – which often (if you’re anything like me) ended up gathering dust on a forgotten corner of the desk. These days it’s about racking up the number of connections either online or within our databases.

Both these situations have the same outcome – a massive potential network and no influence. I would rather you have 50 people who are highly engaged in everything that you do – commenting, joining the conversation and sharing your insights among their own networks – than 5000 people on a list that have never been touched.

In other words, popularity is the wrong metric – focus instead on influence. Focus on having people engaged enough with what you’re doing – so much so that they would happily share your ideas, insights and achievements with everybody that they know. In other words influence is the ability to say ‘look over there’ and have people engaged enough to look. Your responsibility then becomes making sure that what you point them towards, what you contribute, is and valuable as possible.

Engage rather than collect

While collecting contacts is a vanity metric, engaging with contacts is a value-driving activity. The best way I know how to engage with others online is to become the ‘primary translator’ of your space.

A translator is someone who goes out into the areas where others don’t have the time, nor the bandwidth, nor the experience to go, and bring relevant information back for their network in a language they understand. If you want to stand out and build your influence, you need to become the translator of valuable information for your target audience. What does that look like? The best place to start is to make a list of the top questions the people you are wanting to influence are asking in relation to your area of expertise. If you’re not sure – ask! Then systematically go through that list and find the best way to contribute the answers. It might be in the form of articles, videos, internal presentations, checklists, how to guides, insight reports or even preparing in advance in order to contribute more actively in meetings.

Another good exercise is to take a moment to think about the translators that you follow. Whose work do you consistently follow or read? Now think about what they translate for you; the value they bring, and how they go about it – do they present the information in essay-length blog articles, or bite-sized posts? If you consistently give them your valuable attention – I guarantee you they effectively translate something important to your world.

Speak the language of the business

You’ll notice I mentioned that the first step in becoming the translator – is getting to know what questions are important to the people you’re trying to reach. For procurement professionals this means understanding what questions your business stakeholders are asking. What are their challenges? What are their opportunities? That they may or may not have seen? Then it’s up to you to access your own expertise and bring that information back to them – not in procurement technical language, but in their language – in the language they already speak.

Translators know that they need to be able to speak the language of the business, and also understand that a multitude of languages exist within every organisation. This is often referred to as ‘charismatic language’. Every group and community of people has one. Your finance function, for example, will speak a very different language – use very different and specific words – than your stakeholders in marketing. What they do have in common, however, is that neither group of stakeholders will want to hear you talk about RFPs, RFXs, or tenders.

Become the trusted authority

Take time to revisit your network of stakeholder (both online and in the office) and think about what subjects you can translate for them – within your area of expertise. Doing so will capture their attention and help build their perception of you as an influential subject matter expert. However – much larger than that. They will know that you care about – and have real value to share in relation to – the issues that are important to them.

It’s this decision – to become your organisations primary translator and contribute your mastery in a format that resonates – that will quickly accelerate you to the role of trusted authority.

Now that’s the metric of real influence.

To Appreciate the Value of Digital Networks, Look to the Skies…

How are digital networks providing greater visibility and helping to achieve savings by making risk more manageable? 

On route to a recent conference on how procurement networks are reshaping the aviation industry, I realised how amazing it was to be arriving in the historic city of Athens, the cradle of Western civilisation. My enthusiasm owes not only to the city’s timeless beauty, though that’s reason enough to visit. Athens, it turns out, is ideally suited for such a gathering because it holds a unique place in the imagination for all of us who’ve ever wanted to fly.

When you’re fortunate enough to have as many Greek family members as I do, you learn about the ancient legends. So the fable of Icarus is well known to me.

Icarus, of course, was an early aviator. He looked to the birds and thought, “Why not me?” So he constructed a set of wings using wax and feathers. But his father warned him not to fly too close to the sun as the wax would not tolerate the heat. As we all know, Icarus declined to follow his dad’s advice — and, as he soared skyward, his wings began to melt. Icarus crashed back down to Earth.

What’s the moral of the story? Some people say Icarus was too ambitious, too proud, too single-minded. They say he flew too high.

But I believe Icarus had a different problem. Now, I may not be an expert on classical antiquity. Yet I believe Icarus could have been much more successful — he could have built much stronger, sturdier wings — if he’d only had a better supply chain!

In all seriousness, when it comes to aviation in our own time, there’s no mythology about it: The industry faces immense opportunities but also enduring challenges. High demand and low interest rates have fueled significant growth in recent years. Air transport has doubled in volume every fifteen years, with no end in sight. Aircraft keeps getting more reliable, more efficient, more technologically advanced. But high fixed costs and fierce competition are facts of life for airlines.

That’s why controlling costs spells the difference between success and failure, in every economic climate. To control costs, airlines are turning to technology to improve operations and the customer experience in four main ways: increasing real-time visibility and control, optimising efficiencies across business functions, enhancing service offerings, and deepening customer loyalty through personalisation and rewards programs.

In aviation, we’ve moved from wax and feathers to variable-intake turbofan engines and intelligent avionics. Yet in other respects, the industry remains largely unchanged. After all, the very same factors drive profits year after year:

  • Revenue per passenger kilometer flown. How do airlines engage with customers to generate revenue premiums? Data, of course, plays a key role. What do they know about the passenger in seat 11C?
  • Load factor. How do airlines optimise their routes, aircraft and services to ensure maximum lift per weight? Here again, data proves essential.
  • Unit cost per available seat kilometer. How do airlines maximize efficiency and minimise costs? As with the other factors, the right data leads to the right outcome — for passengers, shareholders, and the environment.

Meanwhile, as airlines seek to optimise value, safety and support while improving the passenger experience, they need to be able to track and manage every part and every piece of equipment. Naturally, it helps to do so when airlines can also track and manage the suppliers of those parts and equipment.

In an industry like aviation, where risk management is so crucial — risks ranging from weather to regulation to commodity prices to exchange rates — savings become essential. Digital networks achieve savings by making risk more manageable. By providing visibility into the interconnected operations of airlines and their suppliers, cloud-based procurement platforms help to identify and resolve issues before they arise, aided by machine learning and artificial intelligence applications.

In addition, digital networks enable trading partners to collaborate on product design and service delivery, thus creating mutual value, extending competitive advantage for their organisations, and empowering them to reimagine not only the airline industry’s future but procurement’s role in shaping it. In the aviation business, real-time collaboration with one’s suppliers unleashes innovation and spurs growth. More often than not, success arises through partnership.

Seldom do we succeed when flying solo.

Continue reading To Appreciate the Value of Digital Networks, Look to the Skies…

Social Currency In Procurement: Do You Know Enough To Be Dangerous?

In recognition of how central social currency is, procurement pros are using their social networks to build, influence, and deliver results. The question is: do you know enough to be dangerous?

Connectivity is central to how we live and work in 2017. When something exciting or unexpected happens, many people immediately share the news, and a picture, on social-media. We read the updates shared by others and offer up our own. We like a post or status update to indicate support or show we are ‘in the know’ and watching important influencers. This constant sharing and consumption of information has become a global phenomenon.

Over time, these exchanges add up to a wealth of knowledge and connections that improve our decisions and elevate the weight given to our preferences – much like the exchange of ‘social currency.’

Social currency in procurement

A similar trend has begun in procurement and supply chain – perhaps in recognition of how central social currency is to us on an individual level. Procurement professionals have talked about supply intelligence for a long time, but now they are increasingly aware of how important their own social networks are to their ability to build, influence, and deliver results.

Professional social currency includes, for example, the recommendations, endorsements and likes that we assign as we go about our business online.  When combined, they create a level of trust, and contribute to organisational reputations of both buy and sell side organisations. When buyers trust that a supplier will be able meet their business needs, or when a supplier trusts that a customer is a good fit for their capabilities in both demand and culture, transaction costs are decreased and the total value potential increases.

The fact that both sales and procurement are investing in their social currency creates a unique opportunity for them to come together and leverage their collective knowledge for the benefit of both organisations.

Being Reactive Vs Pro-active

One of the strengths of social media is its timeliness. Trust is not just about the source or location where information is stored. The more real time information is, the more confidence it gives to decision makers. Having real-time access to information allows procurement to meet the businesses’ needs faster. Timeliness is also at the top of the stakeholders’ priority list when deciding whether or not to engage procurement. When procurement can provide information proactively in real time, identifying which suppliers stakeholders should look at or having the pulse of specific industries, it goes a long way towards demonstrating their value – and adding to social currency.

Having instant access to trusted information alters the range of project options available to a procurement professional. They are no longer in the position of having to be reactive, where the business comes to procurement and says, “We have these new suppliers that we would like to engage – NOW” forcing procurement to scramble, trying to vet them. When procurement has access to real time information, they can readily identify potential suppliers and quickly access industry peer endorsements on those suppliers.

Do you know enough to be dangerous?

Procurement professionals need to know enough to be ‘dangerous’. They should have a foundational understanding of the category or commodity they are supporting, and be able to translate business needs into procurement best practices. This way when they get a seat at the table with stakeholders, they are able to engage in intelligent discussions around what stakeholders are trying to do and what is happening in the industry. Having access to intelligence allows procurement to be the engine driving category or commodity strategy to achieve sustainable value for an organisation.

Today, people call or email each other for supplier recommendations. This manual way of accessing trusted “social currency” is not scalable or visible to the rest of the organisation. The procurement technology user experience has come a long way. With collaborative or social technologies, the data becomes smarter and benefits everyone today and in the future.

The concept of trusted data is not new… the same instant knowledge that allows people to prioritise news shared by their circle of friends or pick a restaurant that has been highly recommended by people with similar preferences… today, decisions are made faster and the outcome is often more successful as a result of social currency.

The insights in this article comprise one of the main takeaways of a supplier intelligence-focused Executive Roundtable Series hosted by tealbook which brought together over 40 forward-thinking procurement leaders from across the country.