Tag Archives: supply chain network

6 Ways To Keep Supply Chain On The Executive Agenda

Supply chain is firmly on the executive agenda (at last!). But how can we keep our seat at the table? Procurious talks to Kearney partner Kate Hart about the burning issues in supply chain – from attracting new talent to co-creating with suppliers.


Supply chain is firmly on the executive agenda (at last!). But how can we keep our seat at the table? 

Procurious Founder Tania Seary recently sat down with Kate Hart, Partner at consulting firm Kearney, to talk about the state of supply chain and what’s coming.



Change, pivot, attract

Supply chain management is increasingly about dealing with disruption, says Kate.

“Recent events have highlighted how susceptible our global supply chains are to disruption, from the pandemic to ransomware attacks to global trade wars,” Kate explains.

So how do we cope? It all comes down to two critical capabilities.

The first is the ability to sense the changing environment and pivot. And the second is the ability to attract and retain core talent. 

That need hasn’t changed for a decade, says Kate. So why is it worth mentioning now? 

“What it means today is very different to what it meant 10 years ago in regards to the importance of being able to sense a change environment and pivot,” Kate says.

That’s because the demands on supply chain professionals have changed dramatically – and certain industries adapt quicker than others.

“Some global geographies are a lot more mature than others so far as their uptake of e-commerce and some geographies have really been lagging,” Kate says. 

Why technology means survival

If retailers were hesitant to adopt new technology, they have an extra incentive now. It’s their key to survival.  

“Amazon has been a trigger for some of those geographies to uptake, but obviously the pandemic has just increased the proliferation of retailers offering e-commerce platforms,” says Kate.

Companies are also becoming more innovative in the way they handle the actual distribution of their supply chains, particularly in the business-to-consumer route.  

“We’ve seen a proliferation of sort of rideshare ‘uberisation’ of that last mile,” Kate says.

“What we’re seeing is those companies that invested in the technology and got ahead of the game really have thrived during this. Now it’s going to be a matter of, you know, catch up or who survives, so it’s going to be quite interesting.”

Understanding the risk

So what are smart companies doing now to avoid future disruption? Supply chain network mapping.

Kate has seen a huge influx of companies not just looking at supplier risk, but looking at suppliers’ suppliers risk and building that information through their supply chains.

Interestingly, this is largely driven by senior executive interest. Never before has supply chain resilience enjoyed such a prominent position on the c-suite agenda.

“It’s beyond just enterprise risk. There is reputational risk, there is financial risk, there are lots of different risks that are inherent in the supply chain and that is very much front and centre in many of our board conversations at the moment,” Kate says.

“The key question that we’re getting asked by boards is how they get visibility in their end-to-end supply chain risk and how they manage that resilience.”

Making it automatic

Companies are also investing more heavily in automation to improve resilience.

‘It’s been quite extraordinary. Some global areas, particularly in the US and in the UK, are seeing a lot of advantage from automation,” Kate says.

“But the investment in automation needs to be deliberate, with a very sound business case, otherwise organisations are investing but not necessarily seeing returns in some areas.”

Technology, like automation, is providing supply chain teams with new levels of influence, Kate says. 

“We’re seeing supply chain organisations use digital tools to create a triage process with a front door to supply chain – a self-service functionality,” Kate explains.

“[It] enables their internal talent team to then work with their business stakeholders to drive extraordinary value.

“So, supply chain is really being impacted positively by digitisation and automation. It’s all part of a focus on resilience which elevates the conversations and, in turn, the value that supply chain can deliver.”

Working as partners

That’s why Kate says the future will be all about human decisions facilitated by technology.

“What does that mean for partnerships across your supply chain?” Kate asks. “It means that the problems that need to be solved are increasingly complex. It requires a very strategic view of your supplier base.”

The strategic view increasingly means changing the relationship to a close partnership.

“In some of the scenarios that we’re working on at the moment, the clients don’t know what the solution is and actually need to engage the suppliers to co-create solutions for problems that are new to both of them,” Kate says. 

That means seeing suppliers as extensions of your own organisation, which is positive.

But as Kate points out, companies still need to maintain “control and visibility so you are not anchored to them in perpetuity. So getting that balance of control versus collaboration right is going to be really, really important.”

The right people

As Kate puts it, the bright future of procurement isn’t possible without the right people.

“All of that is very contingent on the ability to attract, retain, and grow talent – the conundrum of supply chain management for aeons,” Kate says.

“But never is it more important than now. For supply chain management to have a seat at the table it needs to be attracting the core talent that we’re seeing coming out of the universities.

“There needs to be a very strong talent pool that’s feeding into the industry.”

Kate Hart – Partner at consulting firm Kearney, overseeing the supply chain practise within Asia Pacific – can be heard in the webcast series The Future Of Supply Chain Now.

Supply chains are changing. Here are 5 things we know now.

How to Realise and Unlock the Benefits of Supplier Diversity

New research has revealed the benefits organisations can realise by having a top-performing supplier diversity programme.

Supplier Diversity Programmes

Full Benefits of Supplier Diversity Not Yet Achieved

Historically, supplier diversity programs have focused on a narrow combination of meeting government spend requirements, and participating in corporate social responsibility initiatives with under-represented communities.

For example, survey respondents in The Hackett Group’s 2016 Supplier Diversity Study report that their most important objectives are:

  • Improving the corporate image in the marketplace;
  • Supporting corporate culture around diversity and social responsibility; and
  • Complying with regulatory requirements.

Objectives for Supplier Diversity Programmes
Critical Objectives For Diversity Programmes

However, companies are starting to realise that they will not achieve maximum benefits from supplier diversity programs if their objectives stop there. In fact, by expanding the goals and activities of these programmes, organisations can gain access to new markets, innovative supplier partnering practices and avenues for improved corporate branding.

Several hurdles can prevent procurement organisations from obtaining the necessary support to invest in a supplier diversity programme. Often, business leaders worry that dedicating resources will ultimately mean sacrificing procurement savings.

However, The Hackett Group’s research suggests that not only do procurement organisations with top-performing programmes experience no dip in efficiency, but they extract even more benefits from the programme.

For example, 23 per cent of diverse suppliers often or greatly exceed buyers’ expectations and the majority of remaining diverse suppliers are meeting expectations.

Supplier Diversity Expectations & Ranking
How Diversity Suppliers Rank Against Buyers’ Expectations

Top-Performing Organisations Take Strategic Approach to Supplier Diversity

Supplier diversity is evolving from a check-the-box corporate social responsibility requirement, to a strategic enabler providing access to new and innovative products, and increased market share in new and developing communities.

Top-performing companies recognise this and have begun working toward achieving a broader range of benefits from their programmes. Successful ones typically address three areas: global expansion, supplier partnering and reputation management.

Global Expansion

Supplier diversity programs usually start small and then grow in terms of domestic volume and geographic reach. Our survey found that 76 per cent of organisations have diversity programs that are currently limited to the domestic (U.S.) market.

Of this group, 40 per cent plan to expand their program globally in the next two to three years. Global expansion of supplier diversity brings additional benefits, including investment in global economic development and improved relationships with local suppliers and their communities.

Organisations should be sure to engage the appropriate partners before designing a global expansion of their programme. This can include corporate diversity groups and third-party diversity organisations.

Supplier Partnering

Supplier partnering is the process of developing and enhancing relationships with suppliers. Small and minority-owned businesses can be the source of added benefits, including cost savings, process improvements and product innovations.

Investing in the development of local suppliers helps build productive relationships and prepares suppliers to be successful partners. Buyers should also identify candidates for strategic partnerships.

While this is frequently the most immature area of supplier diversity programs, benefits can be significant.

Reputation Management

Developing a strong reputation for dedication to supplier diversity can result in increased market share and talent retention. There are multiple channels available to facilitate a clear and positive message regarding supplier diversity, including both internal- and external-reaching activities.

Procurement groups should look for reputation management opportunities that align with corporate objectives to increase collaboration between groups.

Organisations with strategic reputation management practices typical utilise some combination of social media and local, in-person interactions to interact with stakeholders and communities.

Programme Objectives Must Come from the Highest Levels of the Company.

Top-performing supplier diversity programs are developed and planned with substantial guidance from executive leadership.

Leaders of supplier diversity initiatives should make it a priority to create a culture supportive of diversity and inclusion, not just in procurement, but throughout the enterprise.

All diversity objectives, including supplier diversity, workforce diversity, and community and market interaction, should have the same strategic objectives in order to take advantage of a larger network and create a more collaborative workplace.

Laura Gibbons is a Research Director for The Hackett Group’s Procurement Executive Advisory Program. She has industry and consulting experience in areas such as purchase-to-pay, strategic sourcing, payment strategies, and organisational and process design. You can contact her on Procurious or via email.

Learn more about Hackett’s Procurement Executive Advisory Program here.

How South Africa is Building Engagement with Small Business

A thriving small business community is a sign of a prosperous economy. In South Africa, a new network has been launched to help build engagement with these enterprises.

Procurement on-line portals that efficiently link prospective buyers with qualified small enterprises are the next big thing.

Technology is now available that allows us to quickly and smartly facilitate business transactions for mutual benefit, why are we not doing more to support Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs)? Central and local government departments spend billions; some of this procurement expenditure can be channelled in to the development of the SMME sector.

Some ‘portals’ exist primarily to deliver advice and guidance, that’s useful but it’s not enough.

Why is developing SMMEs important?

A thriving and growing small business community is a sign of a healthy economy. One main objective across Africa is to stimulate economic growth and create jobs; this is one way to do it.

Public sector bodies in South Africa have been urged to ensure their purchasing strategies “explicitly recognise the significant benefits of procuring from local small businesses”. The Minister in charge of small business development said that small businesses have been “historically shut out as a result of bureaucratic and costly procurement practices which favoured big suppliers”.

Developing the SMME sector solves many challenges for governments and for companies that have diversity or enterprise development targets.

South Africa’s initiative

South Africa has a fully functioning SMME solution that has now been in operation for five years. The Supply Chain Network (SCN) came about by necessity. Organisations are required by government to assist in creating jobs for the lesser skilled and unemployed sectors of the population. This portal is made affordable by the support of big businesses and especially by one of the major banks.

It works for the seller by…

  • Providing a profile page with all key information about the seller
  • Showing the seller’s credentials, certifications and trade references
  • Providing a platform for advertising goods and services using an e-catalogue with images

SCN provides a verification service that allows the approved seller to get a priority listing in search results.  Sellers with a high profile score have a better chance of attracting bigger and better clients.

A great feature is easy access to tenders. Available tenders are interrogated using a powerful search facility which all allows for setting up alerts using key words. Tenders can be accessed in summary form or in full detail, saving time and effort for the seller.  

Better still, it works for the buyer…

  • SCN manages vendor certification renewals so that all credentials are current, including Tax Clearance and Company Registration
  • Buyers can use verified information to update their master vendor files
  • Due diligence is simplified, as buyers can rely on the integrity of the profile information
  • The search function uses standard industry terminology (UNSPSC) and smart filters

The SCN system also provides an eRFQ facility with built-in rules. Suppliers can upload all their attachments electronically as part of the response. It is an on-line paperless solution that includes automatic notification to suppliers of any changes, updates, withdrawal, regrets and awards. Particularly useful is the full audit trail on all sourcing activity.

Supply Chain Network in South Africa is a low-cost solution that aims to promote the objectives of growing a healthy small business community. Why can’t it work in other emerging markets?

You can find out all you need to know about the Supply Chain Network on its website.